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 Post subject: Recipes From Food Storage
PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2016 4:22 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
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Tortillas and Tortilla Chips

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Making Tortillas and Tortilla Chips from Food Storage
https://www.thereadystore.com/food-storage/3034/making-tortillas-and-tortilla-chips-from-food-storage/

Tortillas can bring a huge versatility to your food storage recipes and cooking. You could create burritos, casseroles, quesadillas, soups, wraps, tortilla chips and many other things.

In fact, Mountain House offers some breakfast and sandwich wrap fillings that can be put inside tortillas.

Here’s one way to make tortillas out of food storage items: --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Recipes From Food Storage
PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 4:30 pm 
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Trench Cake: WW1 Survival Food-How to Make

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How to Make a Trench Cake: WW1 Survival Food
http://www.askaprepper.com/make-trench-cake-ww1-survival-food/

During the Great War, trench cakes, like the one I’ll show you how to make, were made from a family’s rations to be sent out to the front lines for their soldiers. While making trench cake is a wonderful, heartfelt act of remembrance for the lives lost in WW1, there’s a little more we can learn from the way these soldier’s loved ones used their meager stores to help support the men on the front lines.

They Were Resourceful

Despite war time rations that meant that sometimes families went to bed hungry and luxury food items being tough to lay hands on, British women came up with a way to make a tasty cake from what was available to them. Eggs were precious and not regularly available, so vinegar was substituted instead. Fats were issued in small quantities, so dried fruits were used to help the cake stay moist for a while. Flour was rationed, so the cake was created to be small and compact. These factors made these cakes perfect for shipping from Britain to France because they were little, dense, and they were still tasty a week later.

It’s likely that many ingredients were substituted based on what was available at the time. For instance, the brown sugar in this recipe was likely hard for most families to come by, even though it is a small amount. Governments suggested that people substituted sugar syrups like molasses and honey in lieu of granulated sugar because it was so rare and needed for the war effort. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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