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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Grains & Grain Products
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 1:40 am 
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Storing Bulk Grains

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How to Store Bulk Grains and Rice
http://www.ehow.com/how_4549030_store-bulk-grains-rice.html

Buying rice, oats, barley, quinoa and other whole grains in bulk is almost always cheaper than buying them in little 1-pound bags. Buying in bulk also reduces packaging, making it the environmentally friendly choice. Grain have a long shelf life, but they can still go stale and are prone to insect infestation if not properly stored. Here's the best way to keep your bulk grains and rice fresh for as long as possible. --- Copyrighted --- continued at link,above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Grains & Grain Products
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 1:54 am 
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Wheat Storage

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Wheat
http://extension.usu.edu/foodstorage/htm/wheat

Wheat is the cornerstone of any emergency storage supply. Approximately 150 lbs will supply an adult for one year. A three-week emergency supply is approximately 5-10 lbs per adult. Children under 8 years old would need half those amounts. Wheat has been separated into several commercial classes based on --- continued at link, above ---

Includes:
Quality and Purchase.
Packaging.
Storage Conditions.
Nutrition and Allergies.
Shelf life.
Use from storage.


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour & Wheat
PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2011 4:39 am 
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Wheat Grinders

Image Hat Tip to Americans Networking To Survive

Wheat Grinders
https://grandpappy.org/hfoodgri.htm

Copyright © May 12, 2011 by Robert Wayne Atkins, P.E.
All Rights Reserved.

-snip-

If you are storing food for a long-term hard times event then you will need to make a decision about how you are going to provide bread for your family to eat on a regular basis. This is not a simple decision because it will have a significant impact on the well being and happiness of your entire family. Consequently it would probably be a very good idea to purchase a small quantity of wheat berries during good times and grind them into flour, and then use that flour to make some bread for your family to eat. This will give you the opportunity to determine if this type of "bread made from homemade flour" is acceptable to your family. If it is not then you may be forced to include commercially processed flour (not self-rising) in your food storage plans and rotate or replace that flour at least once every two years. --- continued at link, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour & Wheat
PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:51 pm 
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WHEAT: How to Tell the Difference Between Hard & Soft

Get a New Grain: Wheat Berries
http://nourishnetwork.com/2009/08/25/ge ... t-berries/

-snip-

Wheat Berries

Wheat berries are actually whole wheat kernels. It’s the wheat berries that are ground into whole wheat flour; white wheat berries create a lighter, tan colored flour and red wheat berries yield a darker, tawny tint. Left whole, though, wheat berries are a versatile addition to the kitchen. --- CONTINUED at link, above---

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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour, Wheat & Grain Grinders
PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2012 4:03 pm 
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Wheat-Home Storage of Wheat-General Info

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125 PDF Document

Home Storage of Wheat
http://extension.usu.edu/files/publicat ... FN-371.pdf



CONTENTS
    Types of Wheat
    Selection of Wheat
    Wheat Quality
    Moisture and Temperature Levels for Home Storage
    Preparing and Storing Wheat
    Home-Stored Grain Insect Control
    Answers to Frequently Asked Questions


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour, Wheat & Grain Grinders
PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2012 7:07 pm 
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Wheat-Difference between Red & White/Hard & Soft Wheats

The following post explains the difference between the red & white/ hard & soft wheats:

What Is Hard Red Wheat & What Is it Used For?
http://www.ehow.com/facts_5833079_hard- ... -for_.html

By Eric Tilden, eHow Contributor
updated: January 5, 2010

Image Hard red wheat is a type of grain that is either planted in the fall or in the spring. It has the highest protein content of all the wheat types. Red wheat is an imported product, originating in Jordan, Syria and Turkey.

Identification
Wheat is a type of cereal grain that is grown for human consumption. Hard red wheat is one of six different types of cultivated wheat. --- copyrighted --- continued at link, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour, Wheat & Grain Grinders
PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2012 3:19 am 
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Using Wheat from Storage

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Using Wheat from Storage
http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/using-wheat-from-storage/

Many suggest storing lots of whole wheat or wheat berries which can be ground into flour for baking. Maybe you are not much of a baker, especially when it comes to using whole grain flour.

If you do not yet have a grain mill, or have one that is useless when the electricity goes off, or which requires physical energy but your arm is broken, then what? --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour, Wheat & Grain Grinders
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 5:37 pm 
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Spring Wheat vs. Winter Wheat

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Spring Wheat vs. Winter Wheat

http://histakes-food-storage.blogspot.com/2008/08/spring-wheat-vs-winter-wheat.html

Image "Oh Beautiful for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain. For purple mountain majesty, above the fruited plain."

I love this time of year and I quite often find myself singing this song (above). The amber waves of grain trigger it. I love watching the grain turn from a lush green to a very soft green to deep gold to amber. I love harvesting food whether it be grain, apples, cherries, veggies, potatoes (ahh, the smell of potato dirt), or a variety of other foods. I love the changing seasons and colors... love it!

I've taken too long in answering today's question, but I think I have studied enough to provide a decent answer... ready?

QUESTION:
could you enlighten me on the difference between spring and winter wheat? ... CONTINUED at LINK, above ...


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour, Wheat & Grain Grinders
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 3:56 pm 
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Thrashing Grains On a Small Scale

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How do I thresh grain on a small scale?
Easy-to-Thresh Grains vs. Not So Easy
http://www.islandgrains.com/how-do-i-thresh-grain-on-a-small-scale/

An important first step for the small-scale grower is choosing grain varieties that can be threshed without modern machinery, since some grains grow surrounded by a tough, hard-to-remove outer "husk" or "hull." Some recommendations for easily-threshed grains are:

  • hull-less oats (these oats do have a "hull" or "husk," but it's easier to remove than that of the usual oat varieties)
  • hull-less or "faust" barley
  • Marquis wheat
  • Red Fife wheat
  • rye
  • triticale (cross between rye and wheat)

Some varieties that are notoriously difficult to thresh are:

  • emmer
  • spelt
  • buckwheat

How to Thresh Grains

Small-scale threshing can be done by hand as needed (e.g. if you want a few cups of grain to make a loaf of bread or meal). --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---

Includes these 'Low Tech' Options:

    Dan Jason's Threshing Box
    Lawrence's Threshing Machine
    Other Threshers/Winnowers

How to Thresh Quinoa
How to Winnow Grains


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour, Wheat & Grain Grinders
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 3:05 am 
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7 Ways to Use Sprouted Wheat

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7 Ways to Use Sprouted Wheat
http://foodstorageandsurvival.com/7-ways-to-use-sprouted-wheat/

Image -SNIP- What do you do with those little sprouted wheat grains? Well, here’s seven great ways to use sprouted wheat. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Grains & Grain Products
PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 5:27 am 
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Granola & other Cereal/grains-Storage and/or Recipes to Make Your Own

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Putting the Foods You Love Into Food Storage
http://everythingunderthesunblog.blogspot.com/2008/11/book-2.html

CEREALS
You will need to add the separate serving of ½ c water + 1/8 c dry milk and 1 Tb sugar to your totals.

Granola makes 5 cups or 3 pint jars.
3 c oats, 1/3 c honey, 1 c sliced almonds, 1 tsp cinnamon, ¼ c shortening, ½ tsp salt, ½ c raisins.
Melt the shortening. Place all the ingredients (except raisins) in a large bowl and mix well. Spread onto a shallow pan (or put into 3 uncovered pint jars) and bake until browned (60 minutes or longer). It shouldn’t have to be stirred but you can turn the jars half way through. Watch it closely so it doesn’t burn. For jars, add the raisins and place a lid and ring on the jar as soon as you remove it from the oven. The jar will seal and keep the granola fresh for weeks. For pans, let it cool, add the raisins and store in airtight containers.

Grape Nuts makes 4 cups.
6 c whole wheat flour (4 c wheat), 1 c brown sugar, 2 c buttermilk (2 c water + 2/3 c powdered milk + 2 Tb vinegar or lemon juice.) 1 tsp baking soda, 1 tsp salt
Mix everything in a bowl, press onto 2 cookie sheets and bake until dry (1-2 hours) Grind with a meat grinder to the size of grape nuts and bake again until golden brown. Cool and store in airtight container.

Oatmeal makes 1 cup.
½ c rolled oats (or quick), 1 c water, pinch of salt.
Place salted water and oats in separate canning jars or covered pots and heat. When heated, add warmed oats to hot water and cook to desired consistency. Serve with milk and sugar. Add raisins or dried apples.

Rice Cereal or Rice Pudding makes 4 cups.
1 ½ c rice, 4 c water, 1 tsp salt, 3 Tb sugar. Pudding: 2 “eggs” ½ c raisins, ¼ tsp nutmeg, ¼ tsp vanilla.
Place salted water and rice in canning jars or covered pots and place in solar oven. When water is hot, add warmed rice and cook for 40 to 50 minutes or until rice is done. Add milk and sugar. For rice pudding, add 2 or more “eggs”, sugar, raisins and nutmeg to the hot rice. Stir well and return to the oven, repeating the process until rice is thick like pudding. Add vanilla and stir. Add ½ c milk if desired.

Wheat Cereal makes 1 ¼ cups.
½ c wheat + 1 c water.
Soak overnight. (1 or 2 more c of water will be needed to cook). Place water, soaked wheat and pinch of salt in a jar or pot with tight fitting lid. Cook 2 hours. Add water as needed.


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Grains & Grain Products
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 9:35 pm 
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White Wheat-Info

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White Wheat
http://wheatfoods.org/sites/default/files/atachments/grains-truth-white-wheat.pdf

There are two types of white wheat – “hard” white and “soft” white.
Soft White (SW) is grown in the Pacific Northwest, California, Idaho, Montana and Michigan.

Hard White (HW) is grown in California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

The difference between the two is ... CONTINUED at LINK, above ... (PDF File)

Includes:

  • Definitions
  • History
  • Agronomics
  • Availability
  • Use of White Wheat
  • Demand
  • Nutritional Value
  • Wheat Berry Preparation


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Grains & Grain Products
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 9:50 pm 
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Posts: 2467
Storing Grains Long Term

This is a multi-part guide to storage of grains:

Image

The Survival Guide To Long Term Food Storage: Part 2
http://hubpages.com/hub/The-Survival-Gu ... age-Part-2

Let's look at the different types of grains to consider storing, and how each one stacks up against the others:

Hard Grains

    Kamut
    Dry Corn
    Buckwheat
    Flax
    Durum Wheat
    Millet
    Hard White Wheat
    Hard Red Wheat
    Soft Wheat
    Triticale
    Spelt

Hard grains are the longest lasting of all the food products, as their outer shell acts as a natural hermetically sealed container. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to twenty-five years of storage.

Soft Grains

    Groats
    Hulled or Pearled Oat
    Barley
    Quinoa
    Rolled Oats

These have relatively soft outer shells which fail to protect the delicate and fragile seed interior to the same degree as the seeds which have harder shells. These soft grains will not store for as long a period as the hard grains. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to fifteen years of storage.

Image

The Survival Guide To Long Term Food Storage: Part 3
http://hallicino.hubpages.com/hub/The-Survival-Guide-To-Long-Term-Food-Storage-Part-3#

Naturally, you're going to need somewhere to store all this food, and large plastic containers that can be hermetically sealed are the best. However, you don't have to order these plastic containers by the hundred from your local supplier and pay thousands of dollars. If you need access to free plastic containers --- CONTINUED at LINK, ABOVE ---

===================

The Survival Guide To Long Term Food Storage: Part 5
http://hallicino.hubpages.com/hub/The-Survival-Guide-To-Long-Term-Food-Storage-Part-6

f the seed has been dried well and stored in air-tight containers with silica gel or another desiccant in them, there should be zero effect on either food nutritional or germination quality.

When foods are packed in air they cannot keep as well as when they are packed in oxygen free gases. The reason for this is because --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---

===================
The Survival Guide To Long Term Food Storage: Part 7
http://hallicino.hubpages.com/hub/The-Survival-Guide-To-Long-Term-Food-Storage-Part-7

Whether or not you are interested in harvesting bugs from your wet grain, or if you want to try to eliminate them, these are three main points: --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---

===================
The Survival Guide To Long Term Food Storage: Part 8
http://hallicino.hubpages.com/hub/The-Survival-Guide-To-Long-Term-Food-Storage-Part-8

Another way to treat grains that are intended for extended storage periods is to add Diatomaceous earth --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour, Wheat & Grain Grinders
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2015 11:10 pm 
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Bugs & Grains-Forum Discussion

Originally posted by Mellie,Senior Moderator @ FluTrackers:

All grains that are stored are also subject to weevil infestations. There are several ways around this.

Tightly package the grain in plastic, either tub or large plastic bag or wrap tightly with the very large size saran wrap that stores like Cash and Carry use to wrap palate orders in. A big roll is $20 or so. Go in with friends or family members.

We used 5 gallon soap tubs clean with seal-able lids. Into each we stuffed 4 different 5 lb sacks of... flours, whole wheat, white; and cornmeal, masa; brown and white rice.

To deter bugs we added a number of dried bay leaves from our bay tree (peppermints or spearmint gum also work). Bugs hate this stuff and we were also thinking of continued deterrents later for when we broke into our supplies.

Then we loaded the tubs into our empty freezer overnight (12 hr), 3 at a time. Freezing kills anything that might be there already. The bay leaf treatment might have been enough. (Could be interesting bread or quieche with a hint of bay!) Another way to stop the bugs is to toss in a chunk of dry ice before sealing. That option seemed like too much work for us. Dry ice isn't readily available.

We carefully labeled our stores so we don't have to open anything unnecessarily


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Flour, Wheat & Grain Grinders
PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2015 11:13 pm 
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Grain and Flour Beetles

Image
Michigan State University Extension
Home Maintenance and Repair - 01500523 ,12/04/98

There are three common beetles that infest stored grains, flour, cake mixes and other flour products. These
are the saw-toothed grain beetle, the red flour beetle and the confused flour beetle. All life stages of these
"bran bugs" can be found directly in the food they infest. Infestations are usually discovered when an
infested package is opened for use, or when small brown beetles are discovered in the kitchen near containers of stored grain products.
The sawtoothed grain beetle is about 1/8" (3mm) long, dark brownish-red, and has six saw-like teeth on each
side of the prothorax, the body segment behind the head. The larvae are very small (less than 1/4 inch), yellowish -white and worm-like. Both the beetles and larvae feed on flour, grains, cereals, shelled nuts, bread, dried fruits, macaroni, spices, candy, sugar and other stored products. The small size and flattened shape of the beetles enable them to enter poorly sealed packages.

The complete life cycle (egg to adult) may occur in 40 to 60 days. There may be up to six generations per
year. The adults live for an average of 6-10 months but can live as long as 3 years.

The confused flour beetle and the red flour beetle, are serious pests of milled and processed grains,
especially flour. They may also infest beans, peas, dried fruits, shelled nuts, chocolate, spices and
tobacco. Adult flour beetles are small (1/7 inch), reddish-brown and have a smooth-sided thorax. They are
shinier and more convex than the sawtooth grain beetles. The red and confused flour beetles look very similar,
differing primarily in the shape of their antennae. The larvae are yellowish-white, worm-like, and have a two
pointed structure on the tail end.

The life cycle (egg to adult) generally takes 6-8 weeks. There may be up to 5 generations per year. Adults
generally live for a year.

A fourth grain beetle sometimes found in Michigan homes is the foreign grain beetle. It looks somewhat
similar to the saw-toothed grain beetle, except it lacks the saw-teeth on the side of the prothorax. Surprisingly,
this grain beetle is not usually found in stored grains. It is more commonly encountered feeding on molds growing on moist grain, and in new houses on new cabinets made of particle board. The particle board, when new, may still be damp and mold may grow on the plant materials used in its construction. These beetles can live on this and are often quite common around bathroom vanities and kitchen cupboards. So far, we have no seen this beetle infesting stored products, but given the proper conditions, it could do so.

Integrated Grain & Flour Beetle Management

Purchase susceptible foodstuffs in quantities that can be used in a short time: less than 2-4 months, if possible. When purchasing packaged food, be certain the containers are not broken or unsealed. Check the packages for freshness dates. Once the food is in the home, use older packages before newer ones, and opened ones before unopened ones. Storing dried foods in a freezer will prevent pest development. Keep food storage and preparation areas clean at all times; spilled and exposed food attracts insects.

(1) To control grain and flour beetles, start with a thorough check of all stored foodstuffs. Once the infested materials are found, discard any that are thoroughly infested. Check for open pet food bags for infestation. Check for open dry pet food, these can harbor the beetles.

(2) While all stages of these insects can be killed with heat (130 degrees for 30 minutes), the risk of releasing large numbers of insects during the heat treatment process makes this tactic questionable. The beetles can be killed in packages by placing the items in a freezer for 3-4 days. However, there is no easy way to separate the insects from the food once they are killed.

(3) Contents from all packages (opened or unopened) which appear to be uninfested should be transferred to
glass or plastic containers with tight-fitting lids. It is possible that eggs were laid in these products and that they may hatch later and lead to an infestation if not contained. Boxes, plastic bags and paper bags cannot be sealed tightly enough to exclude these pests. Glass containers make periodic examination of the food easier.

(4) Remove all food, food containers and utensils from the infested areas and clean thoroughly, first with a vacuum cleaner and then with soapy water. Special attention should be paid to cracks, crevices and corners
(including under and behind appliances) were bits of flour, meal or other food may have accumulated.

(5) We do not recommend using an insecticide.

(6) Continue to observe the area for several months after treatment. If beetles reappear, the cleanup may have been inadequate or infested packages may have been brought into the home.

For a complete listing of suggested control options for a for all home, yard and garden insect pests see:
Michigan Insect Pest Management Guide, 1991.

Publication like this are available from your local Extension Service. Read and follow instructions on the pesticide label. Heed all warnings. Check with your physician if you have any concerns regarding your personal health risk.

Revised by Tom Ellis, M.S., Department of Entomology

This information is for educational purposes only. References to commercial products or trade names does not imply endorsement by MSU Extension or bias against those not mentioned. This information becomes public property upon publication and may be printed verbatim with credit to MSU Extension. Reprinting cannot be used to endorse or advertise a commercial product or company. This file was generated from data base 02 on 06/24/03. Data base 02 was last revised on 12/04/98. For more information about this data base or its contents please contact cook@msue.msu.edu . Please read our disclaimer for important information about using our site.


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