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 Post subject: Food Item: Nuts
PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 10:37 pm 
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Originally posted by (lauraB) at Pandemic Flu Informatin Forum:
http://www.singtomeohmuse.com/viewtopic ... c&start=30

Quote:
Forgot another thing you should try not to eat if expired - nuts. Like with cooking oils, the fats in nuts can go rancid after a time.


:arrow: (malachi)
Not that a person would want to eat rancid nuts,but is a food being rancid unhealthy or just unpleasant?[

:arrow: (Medical Maven)
I, too, was wondering about this matter, and hoping against hope that there was still a "free lunch" post-rancidity. Forget it, unless you are absolutely starving to death.

I did an extensive search and read more than several articles, some from biased sources and some not. You lose most of the nutritive value when nuts or oils go rancid and large amount of peroxides are created which can create havoc in your body both short-term and longterm. Cancers in the body are initiated or enabled.

Below is a somewhat biased source that I found, but the section "Fats and Rancid Oil" pretty well encapsulates most of what I read elsewhere.

http://www.pathlights.com/nr_encyclopedia/17canc02.htm

Refridgerating nuts and oils can maybe get you out to a year, but I have eaten shelled walnuts that I had stored in the freezer for several years, and they still tasted okay.

Another way to increase nut storage even further is to buy them in the shell, and then seal them in a freezer bag (or sealed jar) and refridgerate or freeze them.

:arrow: (atropine)
Just my .02....

I looked at that site...it has some good advice but also a lot of very extreme advice...

That does NOT mean that their thoughts are all wrong (though some seem....not reasonable), just wondering how much is REAL science and how much is correlation without causation, how much is proven by double blind, placebo controlled studies and/or well regulated studies with thousands of subjects over a great period of time, how much is a sort of food pc. No offense meant AT ALL, but there are a lot of sites that restrict the diet to, what I feel, is an extreme amount.

Now there are some toxins that have nothing to do with rancidity per se, but rather with molds and such. Aflatoxin is one grave concern, and has been shown to contribute to liver cancer and acute liver damage. This is caused by the aspergillus bacteria, not the break down of oils and fats (rancidity).

As far as I can find, vacuumed and dry roasted nuts both offer protection from rancidity.

I think it is better to risk cancer in the long term than starve in the short term lol. BUT I would not want to risk the aflatoxin poisoning--that is some bad stuff. So any nuts that are moldy, slimy, etc would be def OUT on my list

:arrow: (EnoughAlready)
Nuts are adulterated if they are insect infested or insect damaged, moldy, rancid, or dirty. Empty or worthless unshelled nuts should be removed by careful hand sorting or by machinery.
Nuts and nut meats must be prepared and stored under sanitary conditions to prevent contamination by insects, rodents, or other animals. Nuts imported for pressing of food oil must be just as clean and sound as nuts intended to be eaten as such or to be used in manufactured foods.
Defect action levels have been established for most varieties of nuts. Deliberate mixing of good and bad lots is prohibited even though the percentage of defects in the resulting mixed lots is less than the defect action level.
Care should be taken to eliminate infested, dirty, moldy, or rancid nuts from shipments. Conditions which may cause nuts to be refused admission are described below:
• Insect Infestation- Nuts are insect-infested if they contain live or dead insects, whether larvae, pupae, or adults, or if they show definite evidence of insect feeding or cutting, or if insect excreta pellets are present.
• Dirt- Nut meats may become dirty because of insanitary conditions during cracking, sorting, and packaging.
• Mold- Nut meats occasionally are moldy in the shell and bear fruiting mold or mold hyphae.
• Rancidity- Nuts in this class have an abnormal flavor characterized by rancidity. Rancid nuts are frequently soft and have a yellow, dark, or oily appearance.
• Extraneous Material- Stems, shells, stones, excreta should not be present.
• Aflatoxins- The aflatoxins are a group of chemically related substances produced naturally by the growth of certain common molds of the Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus species. The aflatoxins, especially aflatoxin B1, are highly toxic, primarily causing acute liver damage in exposed animals. Aflatoxin B1 also exhibits highly potent cancer-producing properties in certain species of experimental animals.
Based on studies of certain population groups, it is suspected that the consumption of aflatoxin containing foods is associated with liver cancer in humans, particularly in developing nations. The presence of excess aflatoxin levels in nuts and other products is a significant public health problem and is a basis for seizing or refusing imports of products containing it.
• Bitter Almonds- Because of their toxicity, bitter almonds may not be marketed in the United States for unrestricted use. Shipments of sweet almonds should not contain more than 5 percent of bitter almonds. Almond paste and pastes made from other kernels should contain less than 25 parts per million of hydrocyanic acid (HCN) naturally occurring in the kernels.
Standards for Nut Products- Mixed nuts, and peanut butter are subject to FDA standards (21 CFR 164). The standards establish requirements governing as the proportions of various kinds of nuts and the label designations for "mixed nuts," the fill-of-container for shelled nuts, and the ingredients and labeling for peanut butter. All packers and shippers of nut products should be aware of the requirements of these standards.
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/qa-ind5h.html
List of foods:
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/qa-indq.html


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Nuts
PostPosted: Wed Jun 16, 2010 3:40 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Nuts-Shelf Life

Image WorldsHealthiestFoods.org
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tnam ... e&dbid=104

scrolll down to: The Bottomline: Nuts Digest Slowly

-snip-

Because of their high content of delicate polyunsaturated fats, all nuts, whether roasted or raw, are susceptible to going rancid quickly. It is therefore important to either purchase nuts in their protective shell or if unshelled, from a store with high turnover to ensure freshness. Store nuts in your refrigerator or freezer. Generally, if stored in the refrigerator or freezer, nuts will remain fresh for 6 to 12 months. For more detail on how long specific nuts can be stored, please check the profile for the nut of your choice that is provided on the World's Healthiest Foods website.
==========================
Here's info on specific nuts. Below is just the info on storage of nuts. There's a full description of nutrition, etc. at each link:

Almonds
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=20

-snip-

How to Select and Store

Almonds that are still in their shells have the longest shelf life. If purchasing these, look for shells that are not split, moldy or stained. Shelled almonds that are stored in an hermetically sealed container will last longer than those that are sold in bulk bins since they are less exposed to heat, air and humidity. If purchasing almonds in bulk bins, make sure that the store has a quick turnover of inventory and that the bulk containers are sealed well in order to ensure maximum freshness. Look for almonds that are uniform in color and not limp or shriveled. In addition, smell the almonds. They should smell sweet and nutty; if their odor is sharp or bitter, they are rancid.

If you want almonds with a roasted flavor and texture, choose those that have been "dry roasted" as they are not cooked in oil like their regular roasted counterparts. Yet, even when purchasing "dry roasted" almonds, it is important to read the label to be sure that no additional ingredients such as sugar, corn syrup or preservatives have been added.

Since almonds have a high fat content, it is important to store them properly in order to protect them from becoming rancid. Store shelled almonds in a tightly sealed container, in a cool dry place away from exposure to sunlight. Keeping them cold will further protect them from rancidity and prolong their freshness. Refrigerated almonds will keep for several months, while if stored in the freezer, almonds can be kept for up to a year. Shelled almond pieces will become rancid more quickly than whole shelled almonds. Almonds still in the shell have the longest shelf life.

Sunflower seeds
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=57

-snip-

How to Select and Store

Sunflower seeds are sold either shelled or unshelled and are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the sunflower seeds are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure the seeds' maximal freshness.

When purchasing unshelled seeds, make sure that the shells are not broken or dirty. Additionally, they should be firm and not have a limp texture. When purchasing shelled seeds, avoid those that appear yellowish in color as they have probably gone rancid. In addition, if you are purchasing sunflower seeds from a bulk bin, smell them to ensure that they are still fresh and have not spoiled.

Since sunflower seeds have a high fat content and are prone to rancidity, it is best to store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator. They can also be stored in the freezer since the cold temperature will not greatly affect their texture or flavor.

Pumpkin seeds
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=82

-snip-

How to Select and Store

Pumpkin seeds are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the pumpkin seeds are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure the seeds' maximal freshness. Whether purchasing pumpkin seeds in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure that there is no evidence of moisture or insect damage and that they are not shriveled. If it is possible to smell the pumpkin seeds, do so in order to ensure that they are not rancid or musty.

Pumpkin seeds should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. While they may stay edible for several months, they seem to lose their peak freshness after about one to two months.

Cashews
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=98

-snip-

How to Select and Store

Cashews are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the cashews are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure its maximal freshness. Whether purchasing cashews in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure that there is no evidence of moisture or insect damage and that they are not shriveled. If it is possible to smell the cashews, do so in order to ensure that they are not rancid.

Due to their high content of oleic acid, cashews are more stable than most other nuts but should still be stored in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator, where they will keep for about six months, or in the freezer, where they will keep for about one year. Cashew butter should always be refrigerated once it is opened.

Walnuts
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=99

-snip-

"How to Select and Store"

"When purchasing whole walnuts that have not been shelled, choose those that feel heavy for their size. Their shells should not be cracked, pierced or stained, as this is oftentimes a sign of mold development on the nutmeat, which renders it unsafe for consumption. "

"Shelled walnuts are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the walnuts are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure its maximal freshness. Whether purchasing walnuts in bulk or in a packaged container, avoid those that look rubbery or shriveled. If it is possible to smell the walnuts, do so in order to ensure that they are not rancid. "

"Due to their high polyunsaturated fat content, walnuts are extremely perishable and care should be taken in their storage. Shelled walnuts should be stored in an airtight container and placed in the refrigerator, where they will keep for six months, or the freezer, where they will last for one year. Unshelled walnuts should preferably be stored in the refrigerator, although as long as you keep them in a cool, dry, dark place they will stay fresh for up to six months. "

Peanuts
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=101

-snip-

How to Select and Store

Shelled peanuts are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the peanuts are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure the nuts' maximal freshness. Whether purchasing peanuts in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure that there is no evidence of moisture or insect damage. If it is possible to smell the peanuts, do so in order to ensure that they do not smell rancid or musty.

Whole peanuts still in their shell are usually available in bags or in the bulk bins. If possible, pick up a peanut and shake it, looking for two signs of quality. First, it should feel heavy for its size. Secondly, it should not rattle since a rattling sound suggests that the peanut kernels have dried out. Additionally, the shells should be free from cracks, dark spots and insect damage.

Shelled peanuts should be stored in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator or freezer since excess exposure to heat, humidity or light will cause them to become rancid. Shelled peanuts will keep in the refrigerator for about three months and in the freezer for up to six months. They should not be chopped prior to storage, only right before eating or using in a recipe. Peanuts still in their shells can be kept in a cool, dry dark place, but keeping them in the refrigerator will extend their shelf life to about nine months.


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Nuts
PostPosted: Wed Jun 16, 2010 5:05 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Nuts-Shelf Life

Ochef.com
http://www.ochef.com/179.htm

Because of the high fat content of nuts, they are very susceptible to going rancid, so frankly, you’re nuts if you don’t keep them in the freezer or at least the refrigerator. Light, heat, moisture, and the presence of metal conspire to spoil nuts, so they are best stored in sealed plastic or glass containers in a dark, cool, dry place. The freezer is ideal, and doesn’t harm the nuts at all.

Nuts also quickly absorb odors from their surroundings, which is another argument for keeping them in isolation in cold storage.

Peanuts, pecans and walnuts are most susceptible to spoiling, while almonds and cashews are among the least. Nuts keep for approximately twice as long in the shell as they do shelled. A good rule of thumb is that a fresh nut will keep for four months in the refrigerator and eight months in the freezer. Of course, you generally have no idea how fresh the nuts you buy are, so you should try to buy them from a busy store that turns over lots of product frequently.

Rancid nuts will ruin whatever you put them in, so be sure to taste a sample before you add them to a recipe.


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