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 Post subject: Food Item: Butter & Ghee
PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 5:58 pm 
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Originally posted by NawtyBits at http://www.avianflutalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=964

You were talking about canned butter, well Ghee is basically a clarified butter. There are recipes for it all over the web if you are ambitious, but Ghee is available in many stores now. Cub foods has 1 pound JARS of Ghee in the International Foods section. AFAIK, it doenst have to be refrigerated even after opening (I believe the clarifying process skims off the milk fats...the part that goes rancid.)

:!: Admin Note: Home CANNING butter is NOT recommended!


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 Post subject: Where to get inexpensive powdered butter and sour cream
PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:46 pm 
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MollyMcButter-in baking aisle of local grocer

Canned butter -Internet grocer - has a shelf life of years.
http://www.internet-grocer.net/butter.htm

Dehydrated butter Powder - BePrepared.com
http://beprepared.com/search.asp?t=ss&ss=butter

powdered butter and powdered sour cream.
Hint supplied by ruthbeme -@ Flutrackers
http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9691
If you have a Amish store close by, this is a great place They also have many other dried goods to choose from. Their prices are reasonable also.

powdered eggs and margarine
Macey's grocery outlets or Blue Chip foods in Salt Lake city, Utah
http://www.bluechipgroup.net/FAQ.html
You can get great prices and products I bought the eggs for $10 per can with a 1 to 1 ratio of egg and water. Most are 2 to 1.
From gjs47 - FluTrackers http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9691


Last edited by Readymom on Fri Dec 15, 2006 5:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Taste-tested remarks
PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:56 pm 
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Canned Butter:
if you havent yet purchased the canned butter from internet grocer- be aware it doesnt taste like the butter we are used to from the grocery store. Its richer, and has a funny (to me) taste thats almost "fishy". I'm not quite sure I like it. It might be really good mixed half and half with cheap store butter. Thanks to LMonty-FluTrackers http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9691
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tip: We just purchased one case of butter from the internet grocer website. Looking forward to trying some. If, by the way you find it too salty, then feel free to mash the butter flat and rinse it under cold running water. Mash and rinse, repeat, until the salt is gone. Butter does keep far longer however, if it is salted, the more salt the longer it keeps.
Thanks to Shannon-FluTrackers http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9691
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
BUTTER
Originally posted by Shannon - FluTrackers
http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11732

RE Butter ordered from www.MREdepot.com.
The butter has a slightly different flavor than most American commercial butter. I like it as it comes close to the organic butter we usually buy. It also has a higher butterfat content than does most American butter.


Last edited by Readymom on Fri Dec 15, 2006 5:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Where to get inexpensive powdered butter and sour cream
PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 5:15 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
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Originally posted by Lynda - FluTrackers
http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9691

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Nestle Media Crema/Table Cream. Substitute for cream or sour cream. Available at ethnic groceries. I got it at WMart grocery in Texas, mex food aisle. Very good, and many uses. I made a good Fettucini Alfredo with it.

*Walton Farms canned sour cream powder: Good.

*For powdered butter, Molly McButter seems as good as any. I have it frozen. It's even OK on potatoes when mixed with a neutral tasting fat source.

*I have stick butter frozen in vac bags. I also have the jars to can it. I doubt I will actually can it unless TSHTF, but if you have freezer room for butter, go ahead and buy the jars. (I also have jars purchased to be able to can other stuff in my freezer, if it comes to that)

Honeyville dry egg powder is not bad. I'm not much of an egg lover, but I made Migas (eggs, cheese, salsa, tortillas) with them and they were good.

Nestle Nido dry full-fat milk is decent. Like non-fat dry milk, it needs to be cold, well mixed, and allowed to sit several hours before drinking. The usual dry mild tricks apply here, like a drop of vanilla, etc.


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 Post subject: Where to get inexpensive powdered butter and sour cream
PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 5:33 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
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Originally posted by kr105 - FluTrackers
http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9691

Cheese and Butter: Hats off to the gals at FluWickie who arranged a deep discount at MREDEPOT on this one. Enter the discount code fluwickie on checkout to get between 20 – 25% off your order of canned butter (New Zealand) and canned cheddar cheese (Kraft). For those more home-ec savvy, you can “can” butter and the directions are at: http://homecooking.about.com/library...e/blmisc34.htm


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 Post subject: Where to get inexpensive powdered butter and sour cream
PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 5:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
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Originally posted by T. Modesto,PhD - FluTrackers
http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9691

I was at Sam's Club tonight and they have the canned turkey 3 - 12 oz cans for $8.95
Butter si so expensive and I was in Sam's Club and got a 1 gal jug of buttery flavored oil that I can use in the mac & cheese occassions. It was $6.79 ACT III which has a good flavor. I figured it out that one jug is about 8 pounds equivalent of butter flavor. Which is much cheaper. I also picked up a small jug of the buttery salt flavoring as well for under $3.


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 Post subject: Where to get inexpensive powdered butter and sour cream
PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 5:48 pm 
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Ghee (Clarified Butter)

Originally posted by T. Modesto,PhD - FluTrackers
http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11732

I also just found out that there is a sale on Ghee at Deep Foods, Inc
http://www.deepsbest.com

16 oz of Ghee which is clarified butter is on sale for $4.19 for 16 oz and the shipping no matter what size is only $6.00.

:?: will Ghee last a long time if left unopened?
:arrow: Posted by Shannon - FluTrackers (same thread site)
it depends on how it is packaged. The butter is canned and will last years. Ghee will last a long time in the fridge but you are in a world of hurt if the power goes out, The Indians keep ghee on a warm burner on the stove all the time. So, instead of cold they use heat for preservation. You must have one of the below to insure preservations.
Oxygen poor enviornment in conjunction with initial high heat to kill pathogens
Extreme cold, Constant heat, anything else invites nasties to the party.

:?: (T. Modesto)I think you are talking about if the jar is opened. I was thinking how long will it last unopened. I have never used ghee before. It looks kind of strange in the jar. I shook it up and it looks a bit better but the liquid appears a little bit gritty. I just tasted it. It is not what I expected, it is not exactly like butter that I am use to, but if I add salt to it then it starts to taste what I am accustomed to as butter, yet a bit milder of sorts. Its nice but I don't think I would care for it on toast for breakfast. no matter it is still a bit gritty. [snip] I was thinking of is to buy some of the butter in the cans for the times I treat myself to bread and butter (which I generally never do) and then use the ghee on things like veggies etc and then for baking that calls for butter I was going to use butter flavor oil so I can max my money on that portion of supplies.
:arrow: (Shannon) that is exactly what it should be used for. Ghee typically is used in sauteeing or seasoning foods. Use it as a luxury food. Something to elevate your spirits.

:?: (T. Modesto) how long I wonder will Ghee last in an Non opened jar? Two years woudl be great
:arrow: (shannon) it will probably last a year in normal temps. Fats usually last somewhere between 6 months and one year. Yours has all of the water removed and I am going to assume you keep it in a cool place. I would not let it go longer than that however without checking it for rancidity. After one year regardless of temps ( unless you keep it in the freezer) it will start to degrade. Rancid fat will also make you a very sick puppy. But then your body already knows this and the smell will keep you from eating the product.

BTW, you too might contact the manufacturer and ask about longevity.


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 Post subject: BUTTER CHURN
PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 2:26 am 
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Butter Churn

http://www.wtsmith.com/rt/projects.html#COOKING

Use pint glass jar with metal top.
Cut dasher from piece tin can and fasten to dowel with small nails above and below it.
Image
MAKING BUTTER
A half-pint of whipping cream will make one third cup of butter. Put cream in the churn. Let the boys take turns moving the dasher up and down. After 20 to 30 minutes, butter will begin solidifying on the dasher. Shake until the small bits form one larger piece. Pour off the buttermilk.
With a wooden spoon, stir and press butter to remove excess water. Rinse butter with tap water to remove more water and keep the butter from tasting sour. If the finished product is too sweet, blend in a pinch of salt


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2007 5:02 pm 
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Butter-General Information

Image

From Alan's Stuff: Prudent Food Storage
http://athagan.members.atlantic.net/PFSFAQ/PFSFAQ-3-2.html#Butter

Butter can be found in several forms each with their particular strengths and weaknesses. ---CONTINUED at LINK, above ---

Includes info on:

  • BUTTER POWDER
  • CLARIFIED BUTTER (GHEE)
  • CANNED BUTTER


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 2:55 am 
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GHEE

ImageWhat is ghee?
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-ghee.htm

Ghee is a Sanskrit word for a clarified butter used primarily in Indian cuisine. Because the preparation of ghee involves heat, it has a distinctive toasted flavor, often described as nutty. Before the advent of commercial vegetable oils, ghee was widely used for deep frying. Unlike other butter-based products, ghee has a high smoking point and can be stored without refrigeration for weeks. As long as ghee is stored in air-tight containers, it does not spoil easily.

Traditional ghee is produced from the milk of buffalo indigenous to the regions of India and Pakistan, but it can also be made from any other milk-producing animal. The process begins with the standard butter created through the churning of milk fats, solids and water. This butter still contains a significant amount of moisture, which must be boiled off to create a clarified butter.

Sticks of pure butter are placed in a large saucepan or kettle over medium to high heat. As the butter melts, it begins to boil. The solids settle to the bottom, while a thicker layer of oil forms in the center. The excess water forms a foamy top layer as it boils away.

Once the boiling process has slowed considerably, the middle layer should have a golden brown appearance. This is the clarified butter or ghee. The preparer carefully spoons off this layer, making sure not to disturb the layer of solids on the bottom. The ghee is allowed to cool in an air-tight canister, similar to a solid vegetable shortening or animal-based lard. Ghee can be reheated for deep frying or drizzled over dishes like a syrup or sauce.

Ghee is considered a saturated fat, since it is derived from animals. Nevertheless, some studies suggest that it is healthier overall than traditional Western fats such as lard and margarine. Ghee uses a natural process to maintain stability without refrigeration, unlike the hydrogenated and partially-hydrogenated vegetable oils used in Western cooking.

Authentic ghee can be made at home by using traditional methods, but it can be time-consuming and a bit tricky without an experienced guide. Prepared ghee can be found in the Ethnic Foods section of well-stocked grocery stores and at many Asian markets.

MORE INFO:
http://mideastfood.about.com/od/middlee ... ee_faq.htm

Ghee is a clarified butter used in Middle Eastern and Asian cooking. It is common in Indian cuisine, but you will find it in Middle Eastern recipes as well.

By heating butter, the fat and moiture are separated, and the butter fat is then spooned from the top - the result is ghee!

Ghee has a longer shelf life than standard butter and has a nutty, unique flavor. In Middle Eastern countries, it is used to replace oils and butter in recipes. It makes an excellent oil for sauteing vegetable.

You may be able to purchase ghee in your local supermarket in the ethnic food section. It may be labeled as "clarified butter" or "ghee". Ghee can also be made at home by using this ghee recipe.

More information can be found at:
http://www.punjabi-recipes.com/recipes/301.aspx


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Butter
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:38 pm 
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Home Canning Butter

Image


ImageTo Bottle or Not To Bottle Butter http://www.preparednesspro.com/blog/to-bottle-or-not-to-bottle-butter/

By Kellene Bishop

June 12, 2007. That was a day I experienced a moment of euphoria as a concern of mine had just been satisfied completely. That was the day I discovered you could bottle butter. It was a very, very happy day for me, until I began doing research on it. There were an abundance of comments surfacing on the internet stating that bottling butter simply wasn't safe because it was "impossible" to get rid of any botulism. My joy was squashed. But after speaking to many lifetime emergency preparedness folks who swore that bottling butter was just fine, I decided to do more research on the matter. The good news is I've decided to fully embrace bottling butter. The thought of butter on my homemade wheat bread, even in the midst of a crisis, is just too enticing to pass up. So here's how I've come up with my rationale for bottling butter in spite of what some information on the internet has said. ---CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Butter
PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2011 4:20 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Ghee-More Information

Blog: My Year Living on Food Storage

Another Butter Option
http://eatingfoodstorage.blogspot.com/2 ... ption.html

Image I finally got around to going to an Indian market this week and I bought Ghee, which is just clarified butter. They sell it in all kinds of sizes so I just bought a small one to try it out. It doesn't last a super long time (expires in about a year) but it does NOT need to be refrigerated, even after being opened. YIPPEE!!

The day after I bought it I tried it on toast. It tasted just like the butter that I used to can myself. Completely edible, even on toast. It does have an extremely low melting point so it tends to turn to liquid even just sitting on my counter in mild temperatures. You can keep it in the fridge which keeps it in a solid state, but it isn't necessary to refrigerate it.

-snip-

Anyway, I'm super excited about finding Ghee. There's no way I can store a whole year's worth because my family eats so much butter, and Ghee expires in just one year. That means we would have to use it exclusively in order to rotate it and it's far too expensive for that. My 8oz jar was $3.95. I will have to just store enough that we will be able to have butter when we really need it, but still I can't tell you how excited about this I am. If you could see me right now I'm doing the happy dance


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Butter
PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2011 4:22 pm 
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Butter: Red Feather Butter

Blog: My Year Living on Food Storage

Another Butter Option
http://eatingfoodstorage.blogspot.com/2 ... ption.html

Image Another option that I think I have already mentioned is the Red Feather canned butter from Australia. It's about the same price and, remarkably, is literally butter spread in a can. I've tried it and it taste great, just like butter spread you would buy from the store. The upside to this product is that is has a very long shelf life (15+ years) BUT, once it is opened, it must be refrigerated. Could be a big problem since the chances of us having to live off food storage and STILL having electricity seem small.


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Butter
PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2011 4:24 pm 
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Butter: Powdered

Blog: My Year Living on Food Storage

Spreadable Powdered Butter - FINALLY!
http://eatingfoodstorage.blogspot.com/2 ... nally.html

Image The butter powder is from Shelf Reliance. They even sell it in a small mylar bag if you want to just try it out first. That is what I bought and I put it on my bagel for breakfast this morning. For me, that is the ultimate test. If I can eat it on toast, then it will definitely be fine for everything else. It was far and away the best that I have tried so far. Definitely edible on toast, however, I did not follow the package directions when make it. Rather, I mix it like this to make spreadable butter:

1 TBLS butter powder
1 scant tsp water
1 scant tsp veggie oil
pinch of salt or sugar (depending on which you prefer)

I actually tried one piece of toast made with the salt, and one made with the sugar. The difference was very slight but I personally did prefer the sugar.


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Butter & Ghee
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:08 pm 
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Ghee

Image

Ghee - This is butter that is good for you
http://www.naturalnews.com/034182_ghee_ ... utter.html

(NaturalNews) To some it's known as clarified butter, to others it's the golden elixir of healing - ghee is a staple ingredient in Indian cooking and Ayurvedic healing known for its versatility, great taste, and many health benefits. It's derived from butter through a process of cooking off its milk solids until it becomes an easily digestible, healthier alternative to butter and oil, and it can be used for cooking or as an ingredient to add flavor and richness to foods such as kitchari. --- CONTINUED at link, above ---

Includes:

    -Cooking benefits
    -Health benefits
    -Recipe for making home-made


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