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 Post subject: Food item: Milk
PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 4:39 pm 
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Originally posted on Avian Flu Talk
http://www.avianflutalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=964

You can also freeze milk, until there's no power. Just make sure to shake it up well after thawing


Last edited by Readymom on Mon Dec 11, 2006 4:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Nutritional Value of Powdered milk during Storage
PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 4:40 pm 
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An overview of changes in the characteristics, functionality and nutritional value of skim milk powder (SMP) during storage.

http:// www.usdec.org/files/pdfs/SMPStorage.pdf

October 10, 2001

Summary

Skim milk powder (SMP) has low moisture and fat contents and, when
stored in dry, cool conditions, has a shelf life in excess of two years.
Specifically, when stored at 15°C and a relative humidity of 75%, skim
milk powder has a minimum shelf life of two years,
an average shelf life of three years and a maximum shelf life of four
years. Milk powders are hygroscopic: they tend to attract water readily
from humid atmospheres. When moisture levels are excessive, milk
powders may become sticky, caked or lumpy, and exhibit reduced
flowability and solubility.

These changes affect the ease of use of the product, requiring grinding
for example and may affect the flavor, but do not represent a health or
safety problem. If the powder’s moisture content exceeds
15%, it then becomes susceptible to microbiological growth and should
not be used. Skim milk powder should have a mild flavor and aroma.
After extended storage, some milk powder may develop slight off-flavors.
These may be noticed in rehydrated or “recombined” milk products.
However, milk powders for use as ingredients in manufactured foods and
dry blends generally do not need to meet as high standards of
palatability and redispersibility.

Dried skim milk products stored in optimal conditions in proper
packaging show essentially no change in color, even during two years of
storage at 35°C. In commercial situations, most dried milk products are
susceptible to reactions that can result in small changes in the physical
properties of the product, its palatability and nutritive value.

These changes, however, do not significantly impact the nutritional
benefits of milk powders. Vitamin and protein quality losses during
storage of milk powders, when stored in good conditions, are negligible.
Skim milk powder should be stored in sanitary, cool, dry conditions, away
from strong odors. Milk powders from bags that have been opened or
damaged during transit or storage, or that appear spoiled; to have been
contaminated or tampered with in any fashion should never be used.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 3:50 am 
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Milk is a person prep item that I'm trying to find a suitable substituion for in our own home. Below is an excerpt from a site that seems to have quite a bit of information on this and many other things:

From: Becky's Prep Corner
http://users.htcomp.net/prep/PowderedMilk.htm


Powdered Milk -- making it work… Well, most of you are thinking "Yuck -- only for baking" -- but, I disagree!

Powdered milk has come a long way in the area of flavor and thus usability. This is a food product that in times of need is greatly searched out and even fought over. Wars and crisis times in the past have shown such. Storage of powdered milk, or a substitute for it, is a very essential part of food preparedness.

The latest research states that we should store about 16 lb. per person -- but increasing the grains per person by 100 lb. to 400 lb. -- will work. (They do recommend storing more milk than this for pregnant or lactating women and others who many have special needs.) Otherwise, the old standard amount of storage for powdered milk was 60 - 75 lb. per person. Why did they research and come up with a lower number? Because of the level of waste and shorter shelf life of this product (compared to other food storage products), as it was not getting rotated or used, just wasted.

I have done a bunch of research to try and come up with a sound handout. What triggered this? Two things

    1. people not rotating and commenting about not knowing how :-)
    2. by reading materials/recipes that recommend using much more powdered milk than is presently stated by the manufacturers, so they are inaccurate.
There are several varieties of powdered milk (of course, there are flavored ones as well -- like chocolate!). Storage temperature is very critical in the long term keeping of powdered milks. The cooler, the longer it will keep the flavor on the palatable end (of course, using nitrogen pack/oxygen absorbers as well). Using a bucket or very large container for storage does work -- but it must be used more rapidly than that quantity in smaller containers due to exposure to oxygen upon opening. Mylar pouches or cans are ideal for most people. Keep sealed tight once opened -- moisture in the air will cause clumping.

Whey based: Morning Moo is an example of this type of product. They use the sweet dairy whey as the base and then add in vitamins A & D to fortify the product to come up with a "milk alternative" drink. This is dissolved into tepid hot water and then cold water can be added. Shelf life usually runs about 5 + years based on temperature stored. It can be used in recipes that call for fluid milk except puddings, ice cream and yogurt (note: Morning Moos milk contains less fat than whole milk and will not set up in products that need fat as a thickener). Although Morning Moos milk takes hot water to mix the ingredients, a very small amount of hot water is needed, only one cup to dissolve the ingredients for 8 c of milk. During freezing temps and if you don't have ready access to warm water -- you might want to consider a solar cooker set up to warm up your water to dissolve this product.

Regular nonfat: This is the product sold by the Storehouse/Cannery and several other companies. It is a dense dairy dehydrated milk powder that generally takes a bit of good mixing to get it to dissolve back into water without lumps -- using a blender or a whisk. It is milk that is basically spray-dried and put through one pass in the dehydration process. For the best flavor, shelf life is 3-5 years. After that, the flavor can start to definitely go down hill, although it is still usable for up to 10+ depending on storage environment. It can be used in all cooking. Do make sure it is well blended into dry ingredients when added in as a powder, or you can get powdered milk lumps. (Yup, that is experience talking!) This can be sold as fortified and not fortified with vitamins A and D. Be sure and get one fortified, as these vitamins help with proper nutrient absorption.

Instant nonfat: There is large crystallized versus small crystallized that is more of a powder in appearance. The product sold by the grocery stores is mostly large crystallized granules (Carnation, Albertson's brand, etc.) and milk purchased this way is the most expensive per pound. In large bulk bags, like Maple Island, Country Cream, Best Pack, and Walton (Humboldt) brands -- these are just dehydrated like the regular, but run through the process a second time in order to make a slightly larger size of the powder than the regular -- so it is lighter and airier and thus dissolves into water more readily than the regular. For the best flavor, shelf life is 3-5 years, after that, the flavor does start to change, but just as with the regular, it still can be used for years even if the flavor is off. Can be used in all cooking. Same as with regular nonfat milk, this can be sold as fortified and not fortified with vitamins A and D. Be sure and get one fortified, as these vitamins help with proper nutrient absorption.

Whole: This is powdered milk with the milk-fats left in and usually runs around 4% milk fat when reconstituted. Because of this fat, it has a very short shelf life -- closer to 3 years nitrogen packed. Several sources recommend storing this powder refrigerated. Maple Island does make a whole milk powdered product in addition to their nonfat products (www.maple-island.com). This would be an excellent item to have on hand with younger children or children with health concerns requiring higher caloric intake.

Soy and rice based: For those allergic to milk from cows, soy based and rice based products are available. Generally, they are very expensive and hard to come by in the powdered form. It is most often readily available only in the fluid fortified form -- not the powder for making up yourself. However, it is possible to get the powdered product, but it is pricey and hard to come by. You can also just make your own milk from rice or soybeans, but it will not be fortified (directions located in several cookbooks and websites). Alternate sources for calcium intake need to be evaluated. Handling this type of powdered milk will not be discussed in this handout, but here are sources for those with allergies or concerns:

    Dixie's Soy Milk : 1-800-233-3668 ext. 300, http://www.dixiediner.com
    Better Than Milk : Rice or Soy 1-800-227-2320 by Fuller Life Company
    Soy Quick by Enter-G 1-800-331-5222
    Trophic's Best (Tofu Delight) by the Blue Chip Group 1-801-263-6667.

These can be made yourself, but again, evaluate for calcium levels and supplementation.
Foods made with low fat powdered milk will have fewer calories and less cholesterol than those made from whole milk. Adding additional powdered milk to the recipe will enhance the nutritive value of the recipe without increasing fat content. So, for children struggling to eat enough calories, adding extra powdered milk in with the dry ingredients is definitely a great alternative.

To use powdered milk in any recipe calling for fluid milk, simply add water for the milk called for in the recipe and put the powder in with the dry ingredients, or stir up and use as fluid milk before doing the recipe.

Recipes call for many types of milk. **Please realize that the powdered milk amount you use varies depending on the brand you purchase. I will give these different kinds a type name for ease in using throughout the handout -- so you can pick one based on what you have for the recipes!!

    [type A milk] Country Cream, Maple Island, Best Pack, and Walton's (instant nonfat milk) calls for 1/3 cup of powdered milk to 2 cups water.
    [type B milk] Regular nonfat powdered milk uses ¼ cup to 2 cups water.
    [type C milk] Grocery store powdered milks (like Carnation, Albertsons -- the larger crystals) use 2/3 cup to two cups of water.
    [type D milk] White Morning Moo uses ¼ cup to 2 cups water (dissolve in ½ cup hot water, then add the 1½ of cold).
    [type E milk] Chocolate Morning Moo uses ¾ cup to 4 cups (dissolve it in 1 cup very hot water, then add the 3 other cups of cold).

Of course, these aren't "firm" numbers. I have given you the basic levels to use, and from these you get to be flexible and make it as strong or weak depending on what you individually prefer. Only in a few recipes is there a "right or wrong" amount, as too little in some of the cheese or yogurt and such will make a weak, unpalatable product. However, too much powder can also leave a powdery taste and feel.

All the following can be closely approximated from low fat powdered milk -- of course, the approximations will NOT have the fat content:

Whole milk (these numbers are according to my calculations and trials -- adjust however you like for yourself): For White Moo Milk and Regular milk [B,D], increase amount per cup by 1 tbsp. For the instant milks [A] like Country Cream, Maple Island (etc), increase amount per cup by 1½ tbsp per cup. For the large crystal instants [C] like Carnation, increase amount per cup by 2½ tbsp per cup.

Evaporated milk: Double the strength (two times the powder from regular amounts).
Whipped evaporated milk -- like whipped cream -- NOTE -- I am including 2 different ways to make this:

    #1. (Makes 3 cups) take 1 cup evaporated milk based on your type instructions above. Very thoroughly chill evaporated milk and whip until getting stiff --with the bowl inside another larger bowl full of ice water-- and add lemon juice at this point and continue to beat until very stiff. Sweeten and flavor as desired. A little vanilla and powdered sugar helps with the flavor--add when you add the lemon juice.
    #2. Uses A-5 tbsp B-3 tbsp C-½ c D- 3 tbsp powdered milk, 1 c water, 2 tbsp cold water, 1 tsp vanilla, 2 tsp unflavored gelatin, 4 tbsp powdered sugar. Mix powdered milk with water and heat up to scald. Soak the gelatin in the 2 tbsp cold water. Dissolve the gelatin mixture into milk mixture. Chill until it gels/sets up. Beat with a mixer until it gets like whipped cream -- and at this point add in the vanilla and sugar and continue to beat until well mixed in.


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 Post subject: Milk: Discussion
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 5:16 pm 
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Milk-Forum Discussion

Image

For a discussion on Milk Products go to PlanforPandemic:

Plan for Pandemic: H5N1 Avian Influenza Forum Index -> The Essentials -> Food - > Milk Products
http://planforpandemic.com/viewtopic.php?t=6463&highlight=


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 Post subject: Storing Dry Milks Shelf Life of Dry Milks
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:46 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Source:
Walton Feed
http://waltonfeed.com/grain/faqs/iib2.html

Storing Dry Milks Shelf Life of Dry Milks

Dry milk products are probably the most sensitive to environmental conditions storage foods there are, particularly to temperature and moisture content. Their vitamins A and D are also photosensitive and will break down rapidly if exposed to light.

The area where your dry milk is stored should be kept as cool as possible. If it is possible to do so, air-conditioning or even refrigeration can greatly extend the nutrient shelf life.

If the storage container is transparent or translucent then it should be put into a second container opaque to light or stored in a dark room.

Dry milk will absorb moisture and odors from the air so storage containers should be impervious to both air and moisture. The drier it can be kept, the better it will keep. The use of desiccants is an excellent idea. Oxygen also speeds decomposition. Powdered milk canned with nitrogen or carbon dioxide to replace air (which contains oxygen) will keep longer than powdered milk exposed to air. Vacuum canning or oxygen absorbers will also decrease the available oxygen.

If the dry milk purchased was not packaged for long term storage then it should be repackaged right away.

I purchase the instant variety at my local grocery and repack it when I get it home. I've seen a number of methods used for this and any of them should work.

The method I now use is to pour the powder into clean, dry half-gallon canning jars. Once the jars are filled I add a small desiccant pack and seal. They are dated and stored in the ubiquitous cool, dark place. They must be guarded against breakage, but they offer the advantage of not holding odors, thus allowing for reuse after suitable cleaning. Since they are as transparent the contents must be protected against light. Vacuum sealing and then storing in a dark place may be the best method. Larger jars of 1 gallon size could be used and then re-vacuum sealed after each use. An O2 absorber would take care of any remaining oxygen and would, itself, last longer when used in conjunction with the vacuum sealer. Being glass, the jar can be reused as well as the lid and ring if they're properly cleaned.

Clean, sound plastic one and two liter soda bottles can also be used, but probably should be used just once since the plastic is somewhat permeable and will hold odors.

If you have access to a can sealer, #10 cans make wonderful storage containers for dry milk, particularly if used in conjunction with O2 absorbers.

Another method I've seen used is to remove the paper envelopes of milk powder from the cardboard box they come from the grocery store in and to put them in dated plastic bags. These bags are not sealed. The unsealed bags are then placed in a larger, air tight, opaque container. I've heard of plastic buckets, fifty cal and 20 mm ammo cans being used for this purpose. A healthy quantity of desiccant was also placed in the container. This would be another area where O2 absorption packets should serve well. It's important to remember the containers should be clean and odor-free.

Copyright © 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999. Alan T. Hagan. All rights reserved.

Excluding contributions attributed to specific individuals all material in this work is copyrighted to Alan T. Hagan and all rights are reserved. This work may be copied and distributed freely as long as the entire text, my and the contributor's names and this copyright notice remain intact, unless my prior express permission has been obtained. This FAQ may not be distributed for financial gain, included in commercial collections or compilations or included as a part of the content of any web site without prior, express permission from the author.

Revised: 1 Dec 99


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Milk
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2007 9:15 am 

Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 8:57 am
Posts: 15
Location: New Zealand
Readymom wrote:
You can also freeze milk, until there's no power. Just make sure to shake it up well after thawing

first before freezing as the milk will expand.


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 Post subject: No Milk for Recipe ... Use a substitute!
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2007 4:09 pm 
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Suggestion from RPMI, PlanforPandemic
http://planforpandemic.com/viewtopic.php?p=40219#40219

I don't drink alot of milk, so it mostly gets poured out after going sour. Last night I needed 1 1/3 cup of milk for a recipe, and of course I didn't have any milk. I didn't want to open my box of powdered milk for such a small amount, so I cheated and used a cup of water and 1/4 cup of non dairy coffee creamer. It worked just fine, no difference noticed in the tases of the food. (course it was just hamburger helper). But this worked in a pinch.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2007 11:01 pm 

Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 8:57 am
Posts: 15
Location: New Zealand
You could try freezing the milk in quanities you know you will use.


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 Post subject: Dry & Canned Milks
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2007 5:00 pm 
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Milk Products-General Information

Image

Alan's Stuff: Prudent Food Storage
Dry Milk: http://athagan.members.atlantic.net/PFSFAQ/PFSFAQ-3-2.html#Dry_Milk

Dry, powdered milk is available in nearly as many varieties as the fresh fluid product. Most can be found on the shelves of your local supermarket while a few may have to come from rather more specialized suppliers. Skillfully and knowledgeably used they can vastly improve the quality of your food storage program. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above --

Includes:

DRY MILKS

  • NONFAT (skim)
  • FLAVORED NONFAT
  • WHOLE MILK
  • BUTTERMILKSOUR CREAM
  • MILK SUBSTITUTES
  • BUYING DRY MILK PRODUCTS
  • STORING DRY MILKS
  • SHELF LIFE OF DRY MILKS

CANNED FLUID MILKS AND CREAMS

  • CANNED MILKS
  • EVAPORATED MILK
  • SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK
  • CANNED CREAM


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Milk
PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 4:13 pm 
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Canned Milk

Image Image 'Alaska Rose ' @ American Preppers Network:

:arrow: About the milk, condensed milk is the sweetened milk, evaporated milk is the whole milk needing only water added to use as regular milk.


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Milk
PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 3:19 pm 
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Drinking Evaporated Milk

Image Image Muzhik @ American Preppers Network

You add one cup evaporated milk for every gallon of reconstituted powdered milk to add a milk-fat to the milk. I've also seen recipes where you add one teaspoon (tablespoon?) of vanilla to the mix to improve the flavor. Letting it chill in the fridge overnight always helps.

===========================
From O Chef
http://www.ochef.com/914.htm

Evaporated milk is simply milk that has had about 60% of its water removed. It is routinely mixed with an equal amount of water and used in place of milk — but generally only in cooking. It has a somewhat unique taste — "a bit sweet," according to some; "canned" in the words of others — and not universally loved. No one in our acquaintance admits to mixing up batches of reconstituted evaporated milk to drink.

================================
Image
http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/food/co ... -milk-1101

Evaporated milk can be diluted with an equal amount of water and substituted for fresh milk in recipes and even for drinking.

================================
Hillbilly Housewife
http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/powderedmilk.htm

A Very Rich Gallon of Milk: Measure 3-1/2 quarts (14 cups) of water into a gallon size pitcher. Add 5-cups of dry milk powder and a 12-ounce can of undiluted evaporated whole milk. Mix all together. Chill and serve. This makes about a gallon. It is richer than plain reconstituted milk. If you must use powdered milk, but prefer a richer product, this is the recipe for you. Children will sometimes tolerate it better than straight reconstituted milk, especially if they are already used to fresh 1% or 2%.

================================
Image University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension
http://nebraskanep.unl.edu/nep/images/p ... d_milk.pdf

To use evaporated milk in place of milk in recipes or for drinking, mix with equal
amounts of water. Directions: Wash top of can before opening. Punch two
holes in the top of can. Mix one can of evaporated milk with one can of water.
Refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours before using. Use within 7 days!


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Milk
PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 3:25 pm 
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Powdered Milk

Image
http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/powderedmilk.htm

-snip-

Instant nonfat powdered milk is to the urban dweller what the family cow is to the homesteader. True, powdered milk doesn’t taste as good as fresh milk from the cow, but it is a darned site more convenient to procure, and much easier to store. Additionally, it is a readily available source of protein and vitamin D. It’s also high in calcium which is good to know if you are pregnant, nursing or have osteoporosis in your family history. Since powdered milk has no fat, it’s low in calories (about 80 per cup of liquid milk) and completely cholesterol free.

-snip-

Once reconstituted, powdered milk tastes a lot better than it used to. If you haven’t tried it in the past few years, it’s worth another taste. When mixed correctly and chilled overnight, it has a pleasant, sweet flavor that tastes especially good with homemade cookies. Reconstituted milk doesn’t taste the same as fresh whole milk. If you are already used to skim milk though, you won’t notice much difference in the flavor of reconstituted milk. In cooking, powdered milk performs flawlessly. It can be substituted for fresh milk in almost any recipe with excellent results. Many budget conscious women cook with powdered milk exclusively. This is smart use of resources because the results are so good.

-snip- .... continued at link ....


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Milk
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2010 4:49 pm 
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Taste Testing #10 Canned Milk

Image

The Great Powdered Milk Taste Test and Review
http://selfrelianceadventures.blogspot. ... t-and.html

Ever wanted to find a powdered milk that tastes good? You're not alone. So just in case you don't want to go through the expense and hassle of trying out every kind of powdered milk you can find, read on. I did it for you.

After a comment about the flavor of powdered milk on another post, I hatched a plan to have folks try a bunch of different kinds of powdered milks to maybe find one that tasted good so this reader and anyone else who wants to know (including me) will know which brands would be best to buy because you know powdered milk is not cheap. I had some super help with this milk experiment from Emergency Essentials, Grandma's Country Foods, Walton Feed, Blue Chip Group (now Augason Farms), and Honeyville Grain who all donated some of their milk for the review. Thank you to all of you--we couldn't have done it without you!

So here's the basic setup. --- Continued at link, above ----


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Milk
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2010 6:23 pm 
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Taste Testing #10 Cans of Chocolate Milk

Image

Chocolate Powdered Milks Review and Taste Test
http://selfrelianceadventures.blogspot. ... w-and.html

Remember when we tasted the powdered milks? Yeah, it seems like a long time ago. Well, we also tasted two kinds of chocolate powdered milks--Honeyville and Morning Moos. These are not like Nestle Quick or Ovaltine that you add to milk. They are drinks (actually milk substitutes) that you add straight to water to get a chocolate milk. --- continued at link, above ----


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 Post subject: Re: Food item: Milk
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2010 6:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Making Canned Milk Products from Powdered Milk

Image

Making Canned Milk Products from Powdered Milk
http://selfrelianceadventures.blogspot. ... -from.html

Back when I started storing food I stocked up on some canned milk products like evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk. I've found they don't store very long--the expiration date on the can is pretty much all they're good for and I don't use them often enough to rotate through them quick enough. So check out my post over on Utah Preppers for some information on making evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk from powdered milk. Powdered milk stores way longer than canned milks (I'm currently using powdered milk canned in 1998 and it's fine), so making it from powdered is the route I'll be taking from now on for my canned milk needs.

Making Canned Milk Products from Powdered Milk
http://www.utahpreppers.com/2010/01/mak ... ered-milk/

ImageWhen I started storing food, I thought it would be a good idea to store forms of canned milk like evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk. I bought quite a few cans and have used most of them over the years. However, I only have two recipes I regularly make that call for evaporated milk, and one that calls for sweetened condensed milk, so I did not use every can I purchased before they expired.

-snip-

I will not be storing canned milk products anymore, instead I will be making them when I need them with powdered milk which stores a lot longer than the canned milks (and is less expensive). Here are a couple of recipes: --- continued at link, above ---


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