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 Post subject: Food Item: Potatoes-Fresh
PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 2:45 pm 
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There's an entire thread over at Pandemic Flu Information that is devoted to Growing and Using Potatoes:

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http://www.singtomeohmuse.com/viewtopic ... highlight=

Growing and Using Potatoes

Introductory post:

:arrow:
Larry G wrote:
I've decided to grow a bunch of potatoes this year to offset the increasing price of grains. Have a small area of backyard currently growing grass that I'm turning into a potato patch. 3 questions.
1.) When planting spuds, do they need any fertilizer or special attention?
2.) How does one make potato flour for bread making?
3.) How long can I store them (assuming I have a crop in a few months)?


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Potatoes-Fresh
PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 2:19 am 
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Food Item: Potatoes

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Successful cold storage
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/gist82.html

By Sylvia Gist

-snip-

Ideally, I would have a root cellar which maintained the correct temperature for the produce I would like to keep. Unfortunately, it’s not that ideal, so I have to look for other places to store things. Fortunately, different vegetables like different temperatures, so everything doesn’t have to go in the same place. Other storage options (depending upon the item) include in the ground, under a staircase, unheated rooms, outside stairwells, pits in the ground, or extra refrigerators, to name a few.

A storage method is only the last step to having successful cold storage and fresh vegetables in the winter. The first step begins with the seed catalog; it is extremely important to choose cultivars which store well. For example, not every type of carrot will still be edible the following May. Most seed catalogs are good at telling us which ones have good storage qualities. I have relied on their recommendations and have found particular cultivars of a number of vegetables that store very well for me.

Planting time and harvest time also affect the success of storage. Many storage vegetables are planted later and harvested after frost. In the following discussion, I will note what works best for me as I deal with a fairly short growing season and cool nights.

-snip- --- FULL article can be found at link, above ---

Potatoes

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Potatoes stored in a large basket on the floor of the fruit room
Potatoes are a traditional fresh storage food, but all cultivars are not equal. The challenge is to have an edible supply year around.

Last fall I stored Red Norland, Sangre Red, Yukon Gold, and Kennebec potatoes of all sizes. Red Norland sprouted first, followed by Kennebec, Yukon Gold, and Sangre Red. Sangre Red, also called Sangre, is a round-to-oblong, white fleshed red potato with shallow eyes. It is a very good new potato as well as being great for storage. Digging them is easy, as they generally cluster very near the plant; it is also a heavy producer. Even though a local nursery lists them as so-so keepers, Sangre has been the last to sprout in storage, with the largest potatoes keeping the best. I will eventually have to pull the sprouts from them also, but I do not have ideal storage facilities—just a room in the basement where I keep my canned goods, where the temperature ranges between 50° and 60° F during the year. Potatoes prefer 40 degrees. Colder temperatures will turn them sugary. Much too crisp and juicy for hash browns in the fall, these Sangres reach the perfect condition for frying in June and July.

By planting these early season potatoes the end of May, I get large potatoes by the end of August, which I harvest in late September. Planting earlier, I can have new potatoes earlier, but for storage it works better to plant later here where frosts may kill the tops the first of June and potatoes grow well into summer as the nights are cool and the days moderate.


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Potatoes-Fresh
PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 5:12 am 
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Potato Storage

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What's the Best Way to Store Potatoes?
http://livingprepared.blogspot.com/2009 ... atoes.html

Published February 1, 2005

Since potatoes seem almost indestructible compared with other vegetables, little thought is generally given to their storage. But because various problems can result from inadequate storage conditions, we decided to find out how much difference storage really makes. We stored all-purpose potatoes in five environments: in a cool (50-60 degrees), dark place; in the refrigerator; in a basket near a sunlit window; in a warm (70-80 degrees), dark place; and in a drawer with some onions at room temperature. We checked all the potatoes after four weeks.

As expected, the potatoes --- Continued at link, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Food Item: Potatoes-Fresh
PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 4:08 pm 
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Cooking Potatoes With Mud

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“Mud Spuds” – Clay Baked Potatoes
http://survivaltek.com/?p=2616

Image Trimitive or emergency cooking is accomplished usually with improvised culinary tools or perhaps with none at all. Many foods can be placed right on ash-covered coals to roast. Tubers and roots when placed on coals will turn black on the outside but the skin can be peeled off and the remaining portion tastes great, often with intensified flavors.

Larger potatoes take time to cook so an alternative method is used if you don’t have an oven. By encasing a potato or “spud” with mud ... continued at link, above ...

NOTE: This post can also be found in Alternate Ways to Cook & Bake=Cooking Potatoes With Mud


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