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 Post subject: Trash: Composting
PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 4:35 pm 
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Composting-General Discussion

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Originally posted by (Janet) at Fluwiki:
http://www.fluwikie2.com/index.php?n=Forum.Garbage

If you have enough yard/property, might be wise to start up a compost if you don't trust your garbage disposal.

:arrow: (BroncoBill)
Remember that if you decide to start a compost pile (and they are wonderful for gardening!), be absolutely certain that you put NO animal products in it! No meat, no grease, no poultry, no bones. The saying goes, "If it didn't grow out of the ground, it doesn't go back into the ground". About the only dairy product that can go into compost piles is washed-out egg shells because they are almost pure calcium…but that may become a moot point!

:?: (ricewiki )why can’t you put animal products in the compost?
:arrow: (BB)
Animal byproducts are not considered organic. In other words, they don't decompose in the same way as plant material. Meat will attract flies and maggots, other critters, etc. The fat won't break down and will cause the rest of your compost pile to become cooler than necessary to internally heat up to the proper temps for degradation.

In general, the rule of thumb for a compost pile is this: if it grows in the ground, compost it. If it walks, swims, or flys, toss it out.

If you have egg shells, you can wash those out and put them in the compost pile also. Along with what ImaGardner mentioned above, the calcium is a great additive to your tomatoe plants.

:arrow: (Ima_gardener)
While you can compost meat as it will break down, it is also a maggot/fly attractor and not something you want to be in your compost pile. Grease is so hard to break down and bones? are well.. bones! http://www.mda.state.mn.us/composting/compostguide.pdf and http://www.dairybusiness.com/western/No ... ompost.htm


Last edited by Readymom on Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 9:23 pm 
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Composting-How To Basics

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Hygiene - Waste
http://www.getpandemicready.org/Guides/Hygiene/Waste.aspx

Image Create mulch of what you can. Compost wet trash EXCEPT meats and fats.
Put shredded paper materials over wet trash and add dirt on top of the paper.


Last edited by Readymom on Sat Mar 29, 2008 9:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 9:25 pm 
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Composting Your Garbage

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http://www.guvswd.org/compost

Composting in your back yard... it's easy, saves you money, and produces great amendment for your garden!

Basically, composting is just collecting kitchen scraps and leaves and putting them in a pile or bin. Then Mother Nature does the work of turning it back into soil. Composting can be done with almost no effort. Just add equal amounts of kitchen waste and leaves from the autumn leaf drop and... compost happens!

[snip]

The Lazy Composter

Designate a good spot.
A good spot to compost is one where you won't mind the sight of the bin and one that's not too far from the door (the farther away the bin, the more energy it takes to bring stuff out to it, and worse yet, in the winter you'll have to shovel the path!). The spot should allow the bin to be set on the earth (we want water to drain out and earthworms to visit). It would also be good if the spot had room for two or three bins. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---

Includes information on how to:

-Decide on a bin.

-Collect leaves from the yard.

-Collect scraps in the kitchen.

-Cover with leaves.


Last edited by Readymom on Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 9:27 pm 
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Garbage-How long to Decay?

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http://www2.binghamton.edu/news/the-new ... 2005-09-21

Question: How long does it take for most garbage to decay and can it be used for fertilizer?

[snip]
In order for organic material -- fruit, vegetables, kitchen scraps, etc. to decompose they need to be in an oxygen rich environment complete with heat and water. Composting is a process by which organic material is broken down by microorganisms in the presence of oxygen. The microorganisms break the material down through aerobic respiration. The microorganisms also require water. Through the respiration process, the microorganisms give off carbon dioxide and heat -- temperatures within compost piles can rise as high as 100 to 150 degrees Fahrenheit (28 to 66 C). If the compost pile or bin is actively managed by turning and watering it regularly, the process of decomposing into finished compost can happen in as little as two to three weeks (otherwise, it may take months). It can be done inexpensively by every household and produces a product -- finished compost or humus -- that can benefit the environment as a natural fertilizer for gardening and farming.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:18 pm 
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Image Hat Tip to AverageConcernedMom!

Guide to Home Composting
http://www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/deputate ... /Home1.htm

ImageImage

              Guide to Home Composting Includes:
              Home

              Grasscycling

              Composting:

              Basics

              Get Started

              Fine Tune

              Using


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 Post subject: Re: Trash: Composting
PostPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2010 4:01 pm 
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Website/Blog on Composting:

Compost Guy
http://www.compostguy.com/

From 'About' Section of site:

Bentley 'the Compost Guy' Christie is on a mission to get people reconnected with the earth and on their way down the path towards sustainable living. ... continued at link, above ...


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 Post subject: Ants in Composting
PostPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2010 4:13 pm 
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Ants in Composting Pile

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Get rid of ants in compost bin
http://www.gardenstew.com/about16151.html

Q: How do I safely get rid of a colony of tiny ants that has taken up residence in my compost bin. Turning it over every day does not deter them. They crawl on me when I open the lid, and the compost is full of them and their eggs!!! I would rather not use insecticide. Thanks

A: Ants in there usually means the compost is too dry. Moisten it and roll it several times to break up their nest, it may take a few days for them to leave. And with ants in the yard they may return to the compost bin eventually.

Ants can actually benefit the composting process by bringing fungi and other organisms into their nest. And their moving minerals around in the compost makes it enricher in phosphorus and potassium.

==================================

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Ant colony in my compost
http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/forum ... hp?t=15144

Q: I have one of those black plastic composter's that the City of Vancouver sold to residents. Yesterday, when I went to put in some yard waste and old container soil, I found what is obviously an entire colony of ants. The hill seemed quite far along, with tunnels and what looked like larvea being tended.
What can I do to get rid of the ants? Is there any way to save the compost? Help!

A: I read the link and it suggests that the pile is too dry. I find that hard to believe as the contents seem correctly damp. I had thought since I posted that the thing to do is supplement the compost so that it will heat up beyond ant tolerance. I'm not sure how to do it however. Perhaps add more nitrogen? I read somewhere else a recommedation to use diatomaceous earth to get rid of ants. Would it be possible to add this to my compost safely? --- continued at link above ----

==================================
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How to Control Ants in a Compost Pile
http://www.gardenguides.com/67535-contr ... -pile.html


Overview

Ants seek out compost bins for warmth and protection. Although they may actually benefit the compost bin by introducing bacteria and fungi that help with decomposition, too many ants can be problematic. You can take some steps--both organic and non-organic--to discourage ants from staying in your compost bin.

Step 1

Keep compost moist to deter ants. Ants prefer warm dry areas and may seek out your compost bin if it provides a dry area to shelter them form the weather.

Step 2

Turn the compost to expose ants to the elements and to break up their nests. Disturbing their hiding place while wetting the area may encourage them to move on to drier ground where they can find shelter.

Step 3

Sprinkle corn meal or dry cream of wheat around the compost bin. Ants will carry the cereal back to the nest and eat it, but they are unable to digest cornmeal or cream of wheat. The grain will swell inside the ant and kill it.

Step 4

Place commercial ant traps around the perimeter of your compost bin to prevent ants from returning to the bin. However, if you are opposed to a chemical solution to your ant problem, avoid ant traps.


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 Post subject: Re: Trash: Composting
PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:06 pm 
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Composting Leaves

The following is a discussion on a preparedness website, regarding composting:

Original question by "KensWife" at Prepared Society:

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http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f1 ... mpost-949/

:?: How long does it take leaves to compost?

I have been horrible at gathering my fall leaves for the compost pile. I will be doing that this weekend. I know it can take between 3 months to a year to compost leaves... does anyone have a trick to speed this process up?

:arrow: --- Answers and continued discussion can be found at the link, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Trash: Composting
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 4:40 am 
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Trash Can Compost Bin

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How to Make a Trash Can Composter
http://organicgardening.about.com/od/co ... poster.htm

Image Not every gardener has the space for a large compost pile, and not all municipalities allow back yard composting. The good news is that it's very easy to compost in a small space. Even if all you have is a patio or balcony, you can use this method of making compost in a trash can. And, if you need to compost on the sly, no one will be the wiser---they'll just see another trash can. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Trash: Composting
PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2012 4:39 pm 
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WET Compost & Fruit Flies

When Compost Goes Bad (this mean war!)
http://willamettevalleyhomesteader.word ... -mean-war/

Fruit flies. Only scientists love those little dudes. I was very pleased that the compost in my plastic bin had heated up very nicely. I am a constant but not very textbook composter. Put another way, I compost everything (including the kitchen waste from granny’s house) but I am terrible when it comes to altering green and brown, turning, containing, etc. I usually have a couple.of piles in varying degrees of decomposition and recently added a free plastic bin. Over the last season, I did begin covering my piles, having realized that the heavy winter rains of Oregon were keeping it so sodden I couldn’t turn it without using my entire day’s allotment of energy. Another challenge I deal with is dog, the compost-eater. Things that put in his dish would have him looking at you as if to say, “what’s up with this slop?” suddenly become irresistible in the compost pile. The bin solved this. All food goes into the bin and is unreachable by nasty (but cute) dog.

And so began an adventure. The bin filled nicely, packing down to hold a surprising amount of material. It heated nicely too with all the green material in the form of veggie trim and findings from kitchen and garden. It actually heated up! It bred a bazillion fruit flies. I could not open the cover without needing a face mask to breath, the air being so thick with frenzied fat fruit flies.

So Sunday I Googled “fruit flies compost”. Ding ding ding! --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Trash: Composting
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:30 pm 
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Wind powered Composter

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Wind powered Composter - The Green Twist , Exactly
http://www.instructables.com/id/Wind-powered-Composter/?ALLSTEPS

Image Composting is the easiest thing one can do to help your community. With a wealth of good soil you, your neighbors, and everyone else is stuck with the predictament of what to grow. Imagine such a world.

The problem is that the standard composter doesn't turn itself, and the average human is too everwhelmed with life's callings to take the time to turn the composter once a week.

Hence the self turning composter, wind powered so no additional power is needed. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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