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 Post subject: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2007 2:33 pm 
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Originally posted at PlanforPandemic
http://planforpandemic.com/viewtopic.ph ... highlight=

:arrow: (kr105)
Antibiotics have a "spectrum" of bacteria that they kill. THis is usually due to their mechanism of action. If you remember microbiology, you'll remember that bacteria can be gram positive or gram negative. So the drugs are broken down into broad categories, depending on their base drug and what they can kill. I've outlined them below with representative drugs from each category.

1) Penicillian Family: 4 generations of medications
1st gen (peniciliin): gram positive strep. and oral microbes
2nd gen (dicloxacillin): gram positive strep and staph aureus
3rd gen (amoxil, augmentin): gram positive strep, some gram negative bacteria
4th gen (ticar): pseudomonas

2) Cephalosporins: 4 generations of medications
1st gen (Keflex): kills gram positive bac. and limited gram negative
2nd gen (cefzil, ceclor): kills gram positive (but less effective on staph. aureus), better gram neg. coverage and some aneorbic coverage
3rd gen (omnicef, rocephin): limited gram positive coverage, better gram negative coverage and limited pseudomonas
4th gen (cefepime): Pseudomonas coverage, good gram negative coverage but limited gram positive coverage.

3) Macrolides: This is a group with specific coverages. Some of their drugs include:
-- Azithromycin (z-pack) covers gram positive (staph aureus - non MRSA) very limited gram negative coverage(will not work against E. Coli). First line therapy for community acquired pneumonia.
-- Clarithromycin (Biaxin) similar in coverage to Azithromycin but with even less gram negative coverage.
-- Erythromycin: similar to azith and clarith above.


4) Quinolones (THe BIG guns) CDC has requested that providers not use these as first line therapy because of raising resistence rates. 4 generations of medications:

1st gen (Nalidixic acid): gram negative (not pseudomonas)
2nd gen (Cipro, Floxin etc.): gram negative with pseudomonas), some atypicals
3rd gen (Levaquin): gram negative with pseudomonas, limited gram positive including staph aureus & pneumococcus, atypicals
4th gen (tecquin, avelox): gram negative, gram positive, decreased pseudomonas, increased pneumococcus

There are also sulfa drugs, tetracyclines and a bunch of stand alones (like Macrobid, flagyl and vancomycin)

The two pocket references that I use in clinic the most are Sanford's guide to antimicrobial therapy (tells you which drugs works against which bug) and the pocket pharmacopoeia which gives you dosing.

What folks go to medical school to learn, is what bugs cause what illnesses. It takes years to learn that. Once you know what causes what illnesses, then it's over to the pocket references to write a prescription.

THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECT OF GOING ON ANTIBIOTICS IS TO TAKE THE ENTIRE PRESCRIPTION AS DIRECTED. We have such a high rate of resistence because folks felt better, (& thought they knew better than the provider) and stopped the medication early.

When you are very ill, you have millions of bacteria in your body. When you feel better and stop taking the medication (say around day 7) you only have hundreds of bacteria left. All it takes is one to survive, that is now resistent to that class of antibiotic. It will multiply, and we have a resistant infection. PLEASE TAKE ALL MEDICATION AS DIRECTED

:?: (2cats)
kr,
Would you give us some suggestions about the best ways to store antibiotics at home?

:arrow: kr,
Most medications will last longer if you put them in the fridge. The cold temp will slow down the chemical reactions that degrade the medication.

Most pharmacies automatically put a 6 month shelf life on the label. This is not nec. accurate. I pulled the foil packet out of a z-pack folder and the actual expiration date was a year later than the pharmacist listed on the label. If in doubt, email the manufacturer and ask them when it will expire (Caveat: Amoxil liquid is only good for a few weeks once it is in liquid form.)


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 6:29 pm 
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Antibiotics-Guidlines for Amounts to Use (From Canadian Infectious Diseases Society of America)

The following is from blogger-friend, Fla_Medic. It's a blog entry from his 'Avaian Flu Diary' blog:

IDSA: Educational Guidelines Lower Antibiotic Use # 5715
http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2011/07/i ... lower.html

Image From the [ur=http://www.idsociety.org/l]IDSA[/url] (Infectious Diseases Society of America) today, a major report on the reduction in outpatient antibiotic use in Quebec since an educational campaign, directed primarily at pharmacists and physicians, was begun in 2005.

Quote:
On a per capita basis, outpatient use of antibiotics has declined by 4.2% in Quebec, while increasing by 6.5% across the rest of Canada.


The latest version of these guidelines are available at the Le conseil du médicament website. Image --- CONTINUED at link, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2011 7:52 pm 
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Posts: 2467
Antibiotics-Good information!

Image

Can You Store Antibiotics In Your Preps?
http://tracemypreps.com/2011/10/31/anti ... our-preps/

Image “The first rule of antibiotics is try not to use them, and the second rule is try not to use too many of them.” - Paul Marino The ICU Book 2007

Last week ....

-SNIP-

Having antibiotics available in a collapse situation will be very important, even lifesaving. The question is how can we as preppers obtain a stockpile to be used if other ‘medical resources’ are no longer available? --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2012 1:41 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Antibiotics-Where To Find Them For Medical Storage

:!: This is recommended reading, if you go to the [i]ModernSurvivalOnLine website!

Image

Part 1: Sourcing antibiotics for storing in case the SHTF
http://modernsurvivalonline.com/sourcin ... -the-shtf/

-SNIP-

In sourcing these for a supply order of my own – I checked out Amazon.com which had been recommended to me by several readers. I found all of them to be available and most with past buyer reviews. I found that many reviewers commented on their use being for their “fish” – and when you read between the lines it was obvious the “fish” were really humans. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---

=====================

PART 2: Sourcing antibiotics for storing in case the SHTF
http://modernsurvivalonline.com/part-2- ... -the-shtf/

In Part 1 I discussed the availability of Vet Antibiotics on Amazon.com and also presented a recommended “shopping list”. In this segment a source for “meant for human consumption” antibiotics is considered.

I have been unable to find what I would be considered absolute factual information that leads me to believe that antibiotics meant for animal/fish use are EXACTLY the same as those prescribed for humans. With that said – I personally would not hesitate to use vet antibiotics if it was necessary. Some people would. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---

=====================


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:00 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
The 9 Best Survival Antibiotics

Image

The 9 Best Survival Antibiotics
http://urbansurvivalsite.com/the-9-best-survival-antibiotics/

Image Survival antibiotics are often The 9 Best Survival Antibiotics overlooked by preppers. One reason is because preppers don’t know which ones to buy or even where to get them. Another reason is because they haven’t needed them before so they forget that they might need them in the future. That was the reason I hadn’t stocked up on antibiotics until a long, painful week set me straight.

-SNIP-

Before we move on, a few disclaimers: First, I am not a doctor and I am not giving you medical advice. I’m just repeating some information I learned. I recommend you ask your doctor if he will write you some prescriptions for antibiotics so you can stock up, just in case.

-SNIP-

I can’t tell you everything you need to know in one post. I suggest you look for some books on antibioticsThe 9 Best Survival Antibiotics so you’ll know what and how much to use. It’s my hope that this post will at least get you started. Here then, are the 9 Best Survival Antibiotics. I’ll begin the list with the two that helped me. --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Tue Dec 31, 2013 5:05 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Antibiotics-Using in Extended Emergency Situations

:!: :!: RECOMMENDED READING-A comprehensive discussion on the use of antibiotics in a large-scale collapse of the medical system in an emergency.

Image

Antibiotics And Their Use in Collapse Medicine(tm), - Part 1

http://doomandbloom.net/

Image One of the most common questions that I am asked from prospective survival medics is “What antibiotics should I stockpile and how do I use them?” There isn’t a 60 second answer to this. Actually, there isn’t a 60 MINUTE answer to this, but anyone that is interested in preserving the health of their loved ones in a collapse will have to learn what antibiotics will work in a particular situation.

It’s important to start off by saying that you will not want to indiscriminately use antibiotics for every minor ailment that comes along. In a collapse, the medic is also a quartermaster of sorts; you will want to wisely dispense that limited and, yes, precious supply of life-saving drugs.

Liberal use of antibiotics is a poor strategy for a few reasons: ---CONTINUED at LINK, above---

==================

Antibiotics And Their Use In Collapse Medicine(tm), Part 2
http://www.doomandbloom.net/antibiotics-and-their-use-in-collapse-medicinetm-part-2/

Image One of the most common questions that I am asked from prospective survival medics is “What antibiotics should I stockpile and how do I use them?” There isn’t a short answer to this. Actually, there isn’t even a long answer to this, but anyone that is interested in preserving the health of their loved ones in a collapse will have to learn what antibiotics will work in a particular situation. This is part 2 of a series on the most important antibiotics to have in a collapse situation and how to use them.

One thing that I didn’t mention in my last article is that ---CONTINUED at LINK, above---


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 3:09 pm 
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Posts: 2467
Antibiotics Guide-for Common Infections

Image Antibiotic choices for common infections
http://www.bpac.org.nz/Supplement/2013/July/docs/Antibioitcs_guide_2013.pdf

The following information is a consensus guide. It is intended to aid selection of an appropriate antibiotic for typical patients with infections commonly seen in general practice. Individual patient circumstances and local resistance patterns may alter
treatment choices.

INCLUDES:

  • Respiratory
    • COPD – acute exacerbations
    • Pertussis (Whooping cough)
    • Pneumonia – adult
    • Pneumonia – child
  • Ear, nose and throat
    • Otitis externa – acute
    • Otitis media
    • Pharyngitis
    • Sinusitis – acute
  • Eyes
    • Conjunctivitis
  • CNS
    • Bacterial meningitis and suspected meningococcal sepsis
  • Skin
    • Bites – human and animal (includes injury to fist from contact with teeth)
    • Boils
    • Cellulitis
    • Diabetic foot infections
    • Impetigo
    • Mastitis
    • Recurrent skin infections
  • Gastrointestinal
    • Campylobacter enterocolitis
    • Clostridium difficile colitis
    • Giardiasis
    • Salmonella enterocolitis
  • Genito-urinary
    • Bacterial vaginosis
    • Chlamydia
    • Epidiymo-orchitis
    • Gonorrhoea
    • Pelvic inflammatory disease
    • Pyelonephritis – acute
    • Trichomoniasis
    • Urethritis – acute non-specific
    • Urinary tract infection – adult
    • Urinary tract infection – child


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2015 2:10 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Antibiotics-Usage/Dosage Chart

Image

By Dr Koelker (Armageddon Medicine) .... good quick-look chart
http://armageddonmedicine.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Antibiotic-Indications-and-Dose1.pdf
2-page PDF document ready-to-print


About Cynthia J. Koelker, MD
http://armageddonmedicine.net/?p=7557
CYNTHIA J KOELKER , MD is a board-certified family physician with over twenty years of clinical experience. A member of American Mensa, Dr. Koelker holds degrees in biology, humanities, medicine, and music from M.I.T., Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the University of Akron. She served in the National Health Service Corps to finance her medical education.


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2016 3:11 pm 
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Posts: 2467
Antibiotics-Basic Ones Needed

Image

The Only 4 Antibiotics You’ll Need when SHTF
http://www.askaprepper.com/antibiotics-you-need-shtf/

The most important thing you should know about antibiotics!

Never expect a doctor to phone-in a prescription for an antibiotic without seeing you first. Why? To ensure your illness is in fact a bacterial infection, as viruses do not respond to antibiotics.

For example Influenza is a virus infection – this is why your doctor will never prescribe you antibiotics for this.

Knowing the difference between a viral and bacterial illness may save you time and money. Here are four tips to help you determine when an illness could be viral or bacterial. Take this advice only when you can’t see a doctor (when SHTF): --- CONTiNUED at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Antibiotics
PostPosted: Sat Nov 18, 2017 4:33 pm 
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Antibiotics-What's Best to Stock

Seven Antibiotics to Stockpile and Why
by Cynthia J. Koelker, MD

https://survivalblog.com/seven-antibiotics-to-stockpile/

Assuming your personal physician will help you stockpile antibiotics for TEOTWAWKI, which should you request? Is there a logical reason to have amoxicillin on hand rather than doxycycline?

Here’s what I would suggest and why.
No antibiotic is effective against every type of microbe. Certain ones will kill aerobic bacteria, others are used for anaerobic bacteria, still others are effective against resistant strains, and certain people are allergic to or intolerant of various antibiotics. The following are all generics, running about $10 for about a month’s treatment.

See LIST at link, above ...


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