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 Post subject: Shelf Life of Meds
PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 5:12 am 
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Originally posted by debtrag , Avian Flu Talk
http://www.avianflutalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=964

Also my aunt is a pharmacist and my vet has given the same advise about meds. The expiration date does not necessarily mean that it is bad. Cough meds, liquid tylenol, pills. It means that it is loosing some of its potency. Liquid anitbiotics MUST ALWAYS be discarded after 7-10 days though. Liquid amoxicilliam will begin to mold and even though I have given it to cats after 3 weeks, I definitely would not give it to a human.
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Originally posted by slcmom , Avian Flu Talk
http://www.avianflutalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=964

My hub is a scientist and meds are a little different. Some lose potency, some INCREASE in potency. While they also do not magically go bad on their expiration date, they are only tested to the expiration date so anything after that is a gamble.


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 Post subject: Drugs may outlast label date
PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 5:01 am 
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Drugs may outlast label date

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05150/512789-114.stm

Billions may be discarded due to makers' expiration time
Monday, May 30, 2005
By Michael Woods, Post-Gazette National Bureau
With a migraine headache threatening, reach for Imitrex, the prescription drug that brings these debilitating headaches to a screeching halt. The pharmacy label warns: "Discard after February 2005." Those tiny tablets cost $16 each, almost their weight in gold.

Can you still take it in May? Ask the same questions for scores of other prescription drugs, which cost people in the United States more than $160 billion annually.

The expiration dates on jugs of milk and cartons of yogurt tell consumers when a product goes bad. That may not always be true with the labels on prescription drugs, according to research that includes a little-known government testing program.

Government tests have found that some drugs stay fresh for years longer, enabling the military to save millions of dollars in replacing "expired" drugs. While the American Medical Association has urged the pharmaceutical industry to see if consumers are wasting money by pitching drugs that are still safe and effective, nothing has been done.

The research raises questions about how seriously consumers should take expiration dates on some medicines but leaves them without key information to make decisions, according to Dr. Stephen R. Byrn, an expert on drug stability at Purdue University.

"A consumer really needs to know what they are doing to take a drug that has expired," Byrn said. "In most cases the data to support using drugs past their expiration date is not available, so, of course, consumers would not be able to get this information."

In dispensing pills, pharmacists use the manufacturer's expiration date to pick the "discard after" or "beyond-use" date they put on prescription labels. It can't exceed the manufacturer's expiration date, and usually is shorter. If the manufacturer says Prozac, Viagra, Cipro, Ambien, or Valium expires in May 2006, patients might get a prescription bottle labeled "Discard after May 2005."

The Shelf Life Extension Program (SLEP), however, has found that drugs can stay safe and effective long after the manufacturer's expiration date if properly stored in the original container. Run by the federal Food and Drug Administration for the Defense Department, it has saved the military millions of dollars on replacement of "expired" drugs.

"This program is a large cost saver to the taxpayer," said Ellen M. Kavanagh, an assistant manager of the shelf-life program. In one instance, the Pentagon spent about $350,000 on testing of supposedly expired drugs, and avoided needlessly discarding about $33 million worth of medicine.

Dr. Robbe C. Lyon, deputy director of product quality research at the FDA, said consumers should pay attention to expiration dates on their drug bottles because shelf-life program's findings apply to drugs stored in the original containers under ideal conditions.

"But once the container is opened and exposed to an unpredictable environment, it is difficult to predict the drug effectiveness," Lyon said. "For patients who rely on medications to stay alive, like heart medications, expired drugs can be dangerous because they may not be getting the full effectiveness of the drug."

Other studies, however, suggest that some prescription drugs in the bottles given to patients, stored under ordinary household conditions, also are surprisingly durable. They may remain fresh beyond the "discard after" date.

The Medical Letter, a respected source of independent information about drugs, covered the topic in a 2002 article. It reported that certain medicines, stored in high humidity and other bad conditions, stayed good to use for 1.5 to nine years after their expiration dates. For instance, Symmetrel (amantadine) and Flumadine (rimantidine), anti-viral drugs used to prevent and treat influenza, withstood 160-degree temperatures and were good after the equivalent of 25 years of ordinary storage.

"Many drugs stored under reasonable conditions retain 90 percent of their potency for at least five years after the expiration date on the label, and sometimes much longer," the report stated.

Nobody knows for sure, because a consumer-oriented version of Pentagon shelf-life program -- which would check the actual life span of prescription drugs stored in bathrooms, kitchens, purses, and cars -- has never been done. ...... (continued at link above)


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 Post subject: Re: Shelf Life of Meds
PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 5:12 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
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How To Store Medical Supplies

Image

How to Store Medicines Properly
Keeping Your Medicines at Home Safe and Effective
http://generalmedicine.suite101.com/art ... s_properly

Storing medicines the right way and in the right place is vital to ensure that they continue to work properly and that you and your family stay safe.

Although many people store their medicines at home in a medicine cabinet, often these are located in the worst possible rooms in the house for the medicine itself - the kitchen or the bathroom. Understanding the nature of the medication itself and the environmental factors which can cause a drug to become either ineffective or even dangerous, are important to consider when looking for the best place to store medication at home. ---- Continued at link, above ---

Includes:

Medicines Can Be Very Unstable
Heat
Cold
Light
Expiry Date
Tell Tale Signs Of "Spoiled" Medicines
Best Way To Store Medicines


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 Post subject: Re: Shelf Life of Meds
PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2010 3:05 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Is it Dangerous to Take Expired Drugs?

Image 'tigger2' @ American Preppers Network

Image

Is it Dangerous to Take Expired Drugs?
http://www.teenoverthecounterdrugabuse. ... anger.html

Since 1979, federal law has made it mandatory for drug manufacturers to place an expiration date on both prescription and over-the-counter medications. This date, generally two to three years from the date of purchase, signals the length of time the product can be guaranteed to maintain full potency and safety in an unopened package. Does this mean that medications lose their effectiveness or worse yet, become dangerous after the expiration date? --- continued at link, above --- Teen Prescription and OTC Drug Abuse © 2008


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 Post subject: Re: Shelf Life of Meds
PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2011 7:47 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
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Expiration of Meds

Image

Expired, or Not Expired… That is the Question
http://tracemypreps.com/2011/11/02/expi ... -question/

Image What medications* do we keep in our preps? We store: 1) over-the-counter (OTC) drugs: ibuprofen (Motrin), acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, diphenhydramine (Benadryl), pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), loratadine (Claritin), guaifenesin (Mucinex), and 2) antibiotics (that I recently posted about): amoxicillin, cephalexin, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, metronidazole.

How long can they be stored? They have expiration dates, does that mean they go bad?

Let’s start with --- CONTINUEd at LINK, above ---


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 Post subject: Re: Shelf Life of Meds
PostPosted: Sat Apr 07, 2012 3:06 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Expiration Dates-of Medicines

:!: :!: RECOMMENDED READING :!: :!: Invaluable information regarding expiration dates of medicines!

Image

The Truth About Expiration Dates
http://www.doomandbloom.net/the-truth-a ... n-dates-2/

Image As a physician, I get a lot of questions about expiration dates on medications and whether medications should be thrown out once they hit that date. Those of us in the preparedness community accumulate medicines for use in an uncertain future. Part of the uncertainty is if and when a collapse situation will descend on our society. Even government agencies wonder if their medical supplies will still be effective; it’s time to clear the air about what an expiration date really means.

Expiration dates have been mandated for medications since 1979. This is what they mean: The expiration date is the last date that the pharmaceutical company will guarantee that the drug is at 100% full potency. There is nothing, except in very rare cases, that suggests ... --- CONTINUED at LINK, above ---


Last edited by Readymom on Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Updated Link


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 Post subject: Re: Shelf Life of Meds
PostPosted: Sun Apr 08, 2012 6:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:42 pm
Posts: 2467
Tetracycline-Shelf Life

        :!: :!: :!: DO NOT KEEP THIS MEDICATION PAST EXPIRATION DATE! :!: :!: :!:

Image From the American Preppers Network forum:
http://www.americanpreppersnetwork.net/viewtopic.php?p=141839#p141839

:arrow: (Original post by "IceFire") Add this one to the list of things that DO have a definite expiration:

Tetracycline. It DOES have an expiration, and as it degrades, becomes QUITE toxic! There was a case back in the 1980s wh ended up accidentally killing his entire family by giving them expired tetracycline for colds (Shouldn't be using antibiotics for colds anyway, but that's beside the point). I read about it in a medical journal when I worked at our vet clinic overseas.


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